Tuesday Open Thread ~ Catch of the Day


~
I must be a mermaid, Rango. I have no fear of depths and a great fear of shallow living.
~ Anais Nin
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~

Good Morning!

Welcome to Tuesday's Open Thread! A BIG thanks to QMS for stepping in last Tuesday. I was buried in work and wrapped up in taking care of a sick kitty. After a nine day work stint and many vet visits later, I’m happy to say, kitty is on the mend and I finally got some rest. Whew! So, with out further ado, let’s get to the food!

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~

Meryl Streep as Julia Child experiencing a freshly filleted fish at a French restaurant is not only delightful to watch, but brings back some wonderful memories of my own food related epiphanies. Never much of a fish eater, I found myself among the converted after tasting a beautifully made Dover Sole with a Beurre Blanc while dining in a lovely little bistro in Paris near the Luxemburg Gardens. Very much like the scene in the movie, the fish was lightly bathed in butter and pan fried to perfection. Determined to recreate my bistro experience once I was back in New York, I hopped on the #1 train to a place I knew would have fresh Dover Sole. For those of you not familiar with New York City's original Fulton Fish Market, imagine a hundred or so businesses organically cobbled together around the South Street Seaport. A pungent array of fresh seafood from around the world amid the bustle of trucks and men. With over 200 hundred varieties of fish supplying some of the best restaurants in New York City, it was a chaotic paradise for anyone interested in seafood. For the novice, it was both exhilarating and overwhelming.

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The Fulton Fishmarket, South Street Seaport
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As I jockeyed for the fishmongers attention among the buyers and chefs of New York, I was often treated with an impatience that bordered on disdain. Eventually, over time, my persistence and deep appreciation for good food won them over and what I learned from these men emboldened me to experiment with bouillabaisse, crab cakes, shrimp scampi, and mussel stew in a kitchen that could barely hold two people in it. These days, I've upgraded the size of my kitchen but no longer have the Fulton Fish Market to browse around in. Don't get me wrong, there are good places to get seafood here in Southern California, but it just ain't the same. New York memories aside, this week's Dover sole comes to you from an Asian Market in Arcadia, California. It's a good place to start because this seafood dish is probably the easiest to make, and when adding just the right amount of butter and seasonings, quite delicious. Serve this dish with a subtly oaked Chardonnay and I think you’ll agree.

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Pan Fried Dover Sole with Beurre Blanc
dover sole pic.jpg
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Ingredients:

Dill Butter
1 stick of softened unsalted butter
3 Tbl. of freshly chopped dill weed
1 tsp. of minced garlic

Beurre Blanc (Wine-Butter Sauce)
¼ cup of white cooking wine
3 Tbl of heavy cream
6 Tbl. of Dill Butter

Pan Fried Dover Sole
4 Fresh Dover Sole fillets
1 egg
¾ cup of Panko Bread Crumbs
¼ cup of Parmesan Cheese
3 Tbl. of Clarified Butter (Ghee)
Salt and Pepper

Instructions:

  1. Divide softened butter into 4 pieces and place in mini food processor, or medium sized mixing bowl
  2. Add dill and garlic and mix well; set aside
  3. In a small sauce pan add wine and cook over medium high heat, reducing wine by 50% (this may take up to 5 minutes)
  4. Add cream and dill butter, mix until melted, set aside and keep warm
  5. In two shallow bowls, prepare sole for dredging (beaten egg in one, panko and parmesan in the other)
  6. Heat pan to proper temperature before adding sole fillets
  7. ~

    pro tip chef hat2.jpg To prevent sticking, your pan must reach a temperature of 320 degrees Fahrenheit. How do you know when your pan has reached the right temperature? Here’s a tip: Drop ¼ tsp of water in your pan, if it does nothing, it’s too cold. If it bubbles and steams, it’s still too cold. If it forms into one bubble and glides along the pan, you’re ready to start pan frying.

    ~
  8. When your pan is hot enough, melt clarified butter and quickly dip the fillets in the egg mixture and then in the panko mixture, frying for about 3 to 4 minutes on each side until brown and crispy.
  9. Plate, salt and pepper to taste, serve with the Beurre Blanc

Serves: 4

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Balducci's in Greenwich Village
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Long before I was dazzled by the produce markets of Italy, I fell in love with Balducci's. A landmark Italian gourmet store in Greenwich Village that once sold the best produce anywhere in the city. A place where you could get red chicory, five different kinds of eggplant, custom grown broccoli rabe from Italy, and pitahaya (a sweet pink fruit shaped like a mango), and trevigiano (a variety of raddichio). In the early 1980’s, access to this kind of produce was remarkable. Sure there were other gourmet shops like Zagats, Fairway, and Dean & DeLuca, but I preferred the Italian charm of Balducci's. Just a stones throw away from Chelsea, I would walk over there on Saturday mornings and visit Aldo in the bakery section for some freshly made ciabatta rolls. Then I'd say hello to Ciro at the cheese counter and ask him what he thought would go with whatever I was preparing. Luca in deli was always full of suggestions, whether I was putting together an antipasto for guests, or just a sandwich for myself. During the weekdays, I’d often stop by on my way home from work to pick up one of their ready made meals. Typically the dishes they offered were pastas and meat dishes, but sometimes they’d surprise me with something I'd never had before. Roasted cauliflower was such a dish. It’s been over 16 years since Balducci’s closed on Sixth Avenue, but every time I make roasted cauliflower, I remember the place where I first learned about Italian food.

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Roasted Cauliflower
califlower pic after.jpg
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Ingredients

1 head of cauliflower
½ cup of olive oil
2 Tbsp of Dijon Mustard
1 head of garlic, roasted


Instructions

  1. Slice the top off 1 head of garlic; drizzle with olive oil, wrap in foil and roast at 400F until tender, about 35 minutes
  2. While garlic is roasting begin cutting up cauliflower making sure pieces are relatively the same in size (this will make roasting more uniform)
  3. Cool roasted garlic and then squeeze garlic out of cloves and set aside
  4. Turn oven up to 450 degrees
  5. Add Dijon mustard, roasted garlic, and olive oil into mini food processor, or blender, and mix well
  6. Pour into a large sized bowl, adding cauliflower florets a few at a time, coating liberally, and then adding to roasting pan
  7. ~
    califlower pic before.jpg
    ~
  8. Loosely cover roasting pan with foil and roast for 20 minutes at 450 degrees
  9. Take foil cover off, turn cauliflower florets over in roasting pan, and turn oven down to 400 degrees, roasting for another 20 minutes, turn over again after 10 minutes.
  10. Your cauliflower should be done when fork goes through the stem of the largest floret easily
  11. Plate and serve

Serves 4


The Song

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~


The Poem

To the Sea
by Philip Larkin

To step over the low wall that divides
Road from concrete walk above the shore
Brings sharply back something known long before—
The miniature gaiety of seasides.
Everything crowds under the low horizon:
Steep beach, blue water, towels, red bathing caps,
The small hushed waves’ repeated fresh collapse
Up the warm yellow sand, and further off
A white steamer stuck in the afternoon—

Still going on, all of it, still going on!
To lie, eat, sleep in hearing of the surf
(Ears to transistors, that sound tame enough
Under the sky), or gently up and down
Lead the uncertain children, frilled in white
And grasping at enormous air, or wheel
The rigid old along for them to feel
A final summer, plainly still occurs
As half an annual pleasure, half a rite,

As when, happy at being on my own,
I searched the sand for Famous Cricketers,
Or, farther back, my parents, listeners
To the same seaside quack, first became known.
Strange to it now, I watch the cloudless scene:
The same clear water over smoothed pebbles,
The distant bathers’ weak protesting trebles
Down at its edge, and then the cheap cigars,
The chocolate-papers, tea-leaves, and, between

The rocks, the rusting soup-tins, till the first
Few families start the trek back to the cars.
The white steamer has gone. Like breathed-on glass
The sunlight has turned milky. If the worst
Of flawless weather is our falling short,
It may be that through habit these do best,
Coming to the water clumsily undressed
Yearly; teaching their children by a sort
Of clowning; helping the old, too, as they ought.

~
Well, that about wraps things up for this week's edition. Kiss 2
~
Sailboat in Marina.jpg
~
Now it's your turn. Hop aboard and join the conversation!
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Anja Geitz's picture

Ahoy Mateys! How are you all doing this morning? Anyone got a boat and feel like taking me for a sail? I'm kinda in the mood to smell the sea...

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There is always Music amongst the trees in the Garden, but our hearts must be very quiet to hear it. ~ Minnie Aumonier

Thank you for those recipes.

I think you would enjoy Jiro Dreams of Sushi, if you have not already seen it. Maybe even if you have. (I always google Jiro Does Sushi, but Mr. Google helps me anyway. I hate to end our relationship, but I will, one of these days. Duck Duck Go beckons.)

I will not take you on a boat ride, but I will give you the swelling of the ocean tides, courtesy of the "song stylngs" of Monsieur Charles Trenet (and his back up chorale) He was more of an old school French boulevardier than a great vocalist, but he is very entertaining.

How about a boulevardier cocktail, of which I learned when I googled the spelling. Live and learn!

Enjoy.

Until next time, HAW.

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Anja Geitz's picture

@HenryAWallace

Jiro does Sushi, eh? Got a chuckle out of that one. Would you believe it's been on my list in Netflix for almost a year? Keep meaning to watch it but get distracted by other things. Right now it's "Outlander", a time travelling story about a WWII British nurse who finds herself in the middle of Britian's occupation in Scotland, is suddenly rescued from a menacing British officer by a Scottish clan and who then brings 20th Century medicine to the 18th Century highlands. Oh, and did I mention a swashbuckling Scotsman in a kilt who turns that stereotype on its head and is one of the most delightfully watchable characters I've had the pleasure of drooling over in like forever?

But you know, it's good to take a break. I like to savor the enjoyable, so thanks for the reminder! Not to mention all things Japanese are incredibly interesting to me.

When I go out I'm usually a martini drinker, but the boulevardier sounds like a fun drink to ask for!

Thanks for stopping by Smile

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There is always Music amongst the trees in the Garden, but our hearts must be very quiet to hear it. ~ Minnie Aumonier

QMS's picture

Thanks Anja for sharing the fish stories. Not being a fisherman but living by the sea, we have a little local fish market which has some great local piscis offeings, and fresh!

Latest find was Arctic Char. A more sustainable species than Salmon. A silky fish with a flavor between that of Trout and Salmon. Some types spawn in fresh water rivers and lakes where they were born. The omega 3 is comparable to Sockeye Salmon. The meat varies from a pink color to ruby red. They are found around the globe in the high latitudes. Probably farmed as well?

Usually just grill with simple condiments -- Old Bay seasoning, grape seed oil and a dash of lime .

Plummers-Fishing-Lodge-Arctic-Char-4-846x634.jpg

Beware of sharks walking on land!

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Listen to your higher mind.

Anja Geitz's picture

@QMS

I was thinking of you while I was putting this OT together. How I would love to spend some time out on the sea. Maybe we can switch lives for a week or two? My garden is especially lovely right now and all you'd have to do is water my two potted hibiscus trees, the azaleas under the persimmon tree, and pot the little olive tree I bought last night. I've also got a few good bottles of wine down in the laundry room, some onion quiche in the freezer, so help yourself.

The Arctic Char sounds lovely. I'm a big Salmon eater so that sounds quite tasty. Haven't done much grilling, mostly because the idea of using propane tanks scares the crap out of me. But I'll definitely borrow the bay seasoning and lime idea!

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There is always Music amongst the trees in the Garden, but our hearts must be very quiet to hear it. ~ Minnie Aumonier

Good morning Anja and all. Loved the recipes. Not the biggest fish eater but the Denver sole looked delicious. Tend to the white fish when do eat fish. The roasted cauliflower really did catch my eye and have bookmarked that recipe.

My favorite fish market is the Rialto Fish Market in Venice, Italy. According to the inscription on the wall, has been around since 1079a.d. We love to go there and walk around and look at the various fish from all over that are brought in fresh and of course there are the chefs buying as well as the older ladies from Venice. Spent a day following some of the older ladies with their shopping basket haggling over fish, and then to the vegetable stands that are right there.

You can walk to the outside of the market and see the boat pulling up with more fresh fish and other ocean delights. We would get our fill of the market, buy some shrimp and then go to one of the fresh pasta stands and buy some fresh pasta, and take it all back to our place and fix up a lovely meal.

This last trip we found a spice market that was the only remaining spice store on what used to be the spice street back in the day. Bought some al'arrabbiata seasoning that you mix with tomato paste and this was a memorable dinner for us.

Thanks as usual for the delightful stories along with recipes.

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Life is what you make it, so make it something worthwhile.

This ain't no dress rehearsal!

Anja Geitz's picture

@jakkalbessie

What a picture you've conjured up in my mind. The fish market in Venice. Now that is a memory I would've loved to share. Sadly, the three times I have been to Venice, I was nursing a broken heart (oh, the irony!), and was more in the mood to hide away inside old churches and marvel at Titian's masterpieces, then enjoy myself in an open air marketplace. Of course, I could kick myself now for the missed opportunity, but my youthful heartbreak was all consuming at the time.

Your description of watching the boats pull up at the marketplace, and your meal afterwards, is not only authentically charming, but the kind of experience I feel all travelers should be fortunate enough to experience. You have such a treasure trove of stories to retell, have you considered putting them in writing? You have a nice writing voice and sometimes sharing memories on paper can be very satisfying.

Appreciate you stopping by, thanks!

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There is always Music amongst the trees in the Garden, but our hearts must be very quiet to hear it. ~ Minnie Aumonier

@Anja Geitz Thanks for your kind words. Did attend a memoir writing workshop put on by a friend who is a prolific writer and he also suggested writing from all of our travels.
Have done a few memoirs and am working on putting pictures with them from D.O's great collection of photos

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Life is what you make it, so make it something worthwhile.

This ain't no dress rehearsal!

Anja Geitz's picture

@jakkalbessie

I hope we will be lucky enough to read it when you are ready to share it!

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There is always Music amongst the trees in the Garden, but our hearts must be very quiet to hear it. ~ Minnie Aumonier

Pluto's Republic's picture

...when I got here. I lived close to Fisherman's Wharf in San Francisco and was friendly with several of the seagulls. But it was the cauliflower that caught my eye. I've been thinking about baked cauliflower lately, meaning to try it. So I am inspired by your recipe. But you know what I really want to try is cauliflower gnocchi. I was planning to make it myself.

I remember Balducci's. It was an enchanted time.

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The purpose of a writer is to keep civilization from destroying itself.
– Albert Camus
Anja Geitz's picture

@Pluto's Republic

It's funny you should mention cauliflower gnocchi. Trader Joes actually sells a cauliflower gnocchi that's pretty good. Although the texture is closer to the dumplings you'd find in a Japanese Raman than the fluffy potato gnocchi you're probably familiar with, the cauliflower gnocchi work well with pesto, or just some herbed butter and Parmesan.

Glad you could hear the seagulls I sent your way. You have a very good ear Smile

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There is always Music amongst the trees in the Garden, but our hearts must be very quiet to hear it. ~ Minnie Aumonier

Pluto's Republic's picture

@Anja Geitz

Glad you could hear the seagulls I sent your way.

We gave them all sorts of anthropomorphic qualities. I fancied that they were very critical of the way the tourists dressed. They would cock their heads and stare at their shoes from their perches atop the pier posts. Then give a raspy cry of criticism for a tasseled golf shoe, here, or a Birkenstock, there. Very judgmental, they were.

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The purpose of a writer is to keep civilization from destroying itself.
– Albert Camus
Anja Geitz's picture

@Pluto's Republic

If they are that judgmental about shoes, I can't imagine what their thinking about us in bathing suits!

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There is always Music amongst the trees in the Garden, but our hearts must be very quiet to hear it. ~ Minnie Aumonier

Pluto's Republic's picture

@Anja Geitz

I can tell you that.

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The purpose of a writer is to keep civilization from destroying itself.
– Albert Camus
Anja Geitz's picture

@Pluto's Republic

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There is always Music amongst the trees in the Garden, but our hearts must be very quiet to hear it. ~ Minnie Aumonier

enhydra lutris's picture

catch of the day readily don in San Diego, mostly "rock cod", albacore, and yellow tail, with the occasional bit of barracuda. We had them breaded in herbed corn meal and pan fried then hit with a squeeze of lemon. I still love fish that way, but also do unbreaded, devilled, and grilled, pan seared, en papier, or a variation of the latter using chard, kale or lettuce instead of paper or foil. A big part of our fish consumption is fish tacos, for which we simply grill fresh fish with maybe some salt & pepper and possibly lemon, because the curtido and pico de gallo take care of any spices we might need. Wink

We camp up and down the coast, and love to hit the fish markets at the small working harbors, from Noyo, through Morro Bay, etc. Preferred selections are black gill, rock cod, rock fish, including "pacific red snapper" and ling cod. A lightly salted and peppered with maybe some summer savory and on to the small portable grill we carry, with or without lemon, and we're quite happy. At home, and sometimes from SF/Half Moon Bay north to Noyo, we'll grab some fresh salmon and do the same, but with no lemon. It's somewhat quick, simple and really good. De boning is the hardest part, but all it really takes is pliers and patience.

I seem to recall staying at McGrath State Beach not too many years ago and finding fresh fish mongers at either Oxnard or Port Hueneme, and I'll wager that there are still some at San Pedro, Long Beach, Newport Beach, Dana Point, and San Diego, but I find it best to check out all the little less busy harbors and marinas that dot the coastline to look for the small volume places that mostly serve "the locals". Up our way, that's places like Moss Landing, Pillar Point, etc.

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That, in its essence, is fascism--ownership of government by an individual, by a group, or by any other controlling private power. -- Franklin D. Roosevelt --

Anja Geitz's picture

@enhydra lutris

A few years back my Sister and I visited a childhood friend in Morro Bay where I woke up early one morning just so I could watch the fishing boats come in. Your list of places on the coast reminded me I actually live near a coastline. I sometimes forget that here in the foothills.

Thanks for sharing the wonderful menu of seafood you enjoy. I'd like to do more in the way of fish tacos but can't make up my mind which fish is best. Any suggestions?

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There is always Music amongst the trees in the Garden, but our hearts must be very quiet to hear it. ~ Minnie Aumonier

enhydra lutris's picture

@Anja Geitz
the various rockfish, they've got a nice flavor and are firm enough to either grill and then cut in chunks or to chunk up and then grill. You can pan sear/fry them too, we just prefer having them grilled. My wife found this curtido recipe, that's way too much for us, so we make some sort of variation of it, often using chard and/or kale from the garden instead of cabbage, or bok choy just to change it up.

Ingredients
1/3 cup white vinegar
1 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon dried oregano
1 fresh jalapeño chili (about 1 oz.), rinsed, stemmed, seeded, and minced (or less, to taste)
3 cups shredded red cabbage
1 carrot (1/4 lb.), peeled and shredded
1/3 cup chopped onion

How to Make It
Step 1

In a bowl or jar (at least 4 cup), mix vinegar, salt, oregano, chili, and 1 3/4 cups water. Combine cabbage, carrot, and onion; add to bowl and push mixture down into liquid.
Step 2

Cover and chill 4 hours or up to 1 week; mix occasionally to keep vegetables immersed in liquid.

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That, in its essence, is fascism--ownership of government by an individual, by a group, or by any other controlling private power. -- Franklin D. Roosevelt --

Anja Geitz's picture

@enhydra lutris

My Sister does something similar. Sounds delish. And the great thing about doing it that way is you can eat it right out of the jar!

Thanks for the tip about the fish tacos. It's something I've only started eating since I moved to California. In fact I, along with fellow crew members, will be enjoying fish tacos in about two weeks when the taco truck comes to our store, courtesy of management. It's something they like to do to encourage safe practices on the job. If we manage to hit the 90 day mark without injury, we get a party. Sometimes we go to the park and grill hot dogs and hamburgers, sometimes its pizza. This time it's the taco truck! I like to think of taco trucks in California as the equivalent to the corner pizza store in New York. Either way, yummy.

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There is always Music amongst the trees in the Garden, but our hearts must be very quiet to hear it. ~ Minnie Aumonier

smiley7's picture

Balducci's, memories flood in

seeing the photo; did you frequent Murray's cheese shop, too?

As JB writes, Rialto Fish Market amazes the senses and cool to see locals standing in tiny storefront bars having a morning glass of wine, or two.

Fulton's, i didn't get to very often and unfortunately, in these mtns, no fishmongers; and now that i don't go on an annual coastal fishing trip, the fresh fish i eat are ones i catch, mountain trout, mostly, some panfish and smallmouth bass.

I need some sand in my shoes as your morning writing reminds me there is a coast down this hill.

Thanks for this wonderful break from the insanity in hopes you've a great day.

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Anja Geitz's picture

@smiley7

While I was writing this, I wondered how many fellow New Yorkers would remember Balducci's. So glad you did. It makes the experience feel more real when others remember. Smile

Murrays cheese shop? Gosh no. I missed that one. Where was it?

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There is always Music amongst the trees in the Garden, but our hearts must be very quiet to hear it. ~ Minnie Aumonier

smiley7's picture

@smiley7 .

Apparently, it's still there and has grown. "Founded in 1940 by Murray Greenberg, Murray’s Cheese is proud to be a Greenwich Village tradition and part of the neighborhood’s rich food history, along with neighboring destinations like Faicco's, Ottomanelli's and Rocco's. It’s a pretty safe bet to say that we’re cheese obsessed: our goal is to find the most delicious cheese and specialty grocery items from across the globe, teach you a bit about them, and then make sure you enjoy them.

Murray Greenberg was a Jewish veteran of the Spanish Civil War who built a great reputation for the business. In the 70s, Murray sold the shop to his clerk Louis Tudda, an Italian immigrant from Calabria. In those days, it was a humble butter and eggs shop that sold a lot of block cheeses and catered to neighborhood’s Italian neighbors.

Rob Kaufelt, a veteran of the grocery industry, bought Murray’s in 1991 and began traveling the globe, finding new and undiscovered cheeses and bringing them back to the U.S. Our team still travels regularly in Europe and across the U.S. in search of new and great artisan cheeses – from California to Vermont, Athens to Wales – and everywhere in between."

A New York reunion when the lottery comes in. Smile

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Anja Geitz's picture

@smiley7

Yes, I can see it in my minds eye. Never went inside though. Was usually on my way to Joe's Wood Pit Pizzeria a few doors in on Bleeker. The name also conjures up a bagel shop in Chelsea I used to go to. Murrays Bagels. Wonder if it's related?

While I do enjoy my life here in California, I'm so glad I got a chance to have the New York experiences I did. Say what you will about it, and people do all the time, it's one helluva city.

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There is always Music amongst the trees in the Garden, but our hearts must be very quiet to hear it. ~ Minnie Aumonier

smiley7's picture

@Anja Geitz

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Anja Geitz's picture

@smiley7

With the red awning outside its door?

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There is always Music amongst the trees in the Garden, but our hearts must be very quiet to hear it. ~ Minnie Aumonier

smiley7's picture

@Anja Geitz
The Pink Tea Cup was a soul food restaurant on Christopher. Just purchased a bag of frozen, processed in USA, Alaskan Pollock. Going to use your recipe. The power of c99 persuasion, hey?

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thanatokephaloides's picture

@smiley7

Just purchased a bag of frozen, processed in USA, Alaskan Pollock. Going to use your recipe. The power of c99 persuasion, hey?

I've been eating Alaskan Pollock since days when us unwashed masses couldn't own a computer. Alaskan Pollock is the single most versatile whitefish out there. There are ways to cook it whereby it's a good substitute for scallops. And synthetic crab (the better kinds, at least) are based on it.

It's good fish. Smile

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"I say enough! If Israel wants to be the only superpower in the Middle East then they can put their own asses on the line and do it themselves. I want to continue to eat."
-- snoopydawg

Anja Geitz's picture

@smiley7

Now I remember. Never went there though. I did go to the Algonquin further up town which I enjoyed. Lots of history there!

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There is always Music amongst the trees in the Garden, but our hearts must be very quiet to hear it. ~ Minnie Aumonier

Anja Geitz's picture

@smiley7

Me likey Smile

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There is always Music amongst the trees in the Garden, but our hearts must be very quiet to hear it. ~ Minnie Aumonier

mhagle's picture

the sea.

But, wow. The essay, recipes, stories, poetry, music, and everyone's comments are to be treasured.

Slightly off topic but food related. Tomatoes are not all created equal in flavor. This year's early crop of tomatoes are mostly cherry. I am throwing them in the food processor and freezing them. They'll be great in chili and stew. But I am getting a few Striped Boar tomatoes and one Hungarian Heart tomato so far. They are for eating slowly and savoring. Today starting seeds for fall tomatoes. Varieties = Rebekah Allen, Purple Russian, Hungarian Heart, Carbon, Big Rainbow, and Roma. Small plants already started are a Heritage, and Iraq variety. Hope to get lucky. I-m so happy

Thanks Anja and Everyone!

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Marilyn

"Make dirt, not war." eyo

Anja Geitz's picture

@mhagle

Your tomatoes sound marvelous! Are we going to see pictures soon? A beautiful tomato always makes a good picture, doesn't it?

Good to see you. Feel like I haven't been around in awhile with everything gets been going on in my neck of the woods. Hope all is well!

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There is always Music amongst the trees in the Garden, but our hearts must be very quiet to hear it. ~ Minnie Aumonier

enhydra lutris's picture

@mhagle
yours? How about San Marzanos?

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That, in its essence, is fascism--ownership of government by an individual, by a group, or by any other controlling private power. -- Franklin D. Roosevelt --

mhagle's picture

@enhydra lutris

The romas actually came as a free gift in another seed purchase. However, they were a tomato that survived the summer and produced in the fall several years ago.

I am mostly a trial and error gardener. So here, there are spring tomatoes and fall tomatoes. Last year the spring tomatoes either had a leaf curling virus or experienced the 30/90 degree leaf curl thing. They were a bust. Fall tomatoes were beautiful but never ripened because it froze too early. I did harvest them with peppers and froze anyway for soups. Pretty delicious.

So I am planting fall tomatoes in June. That should make the timing right. Also planting in June are winter squash, pumpkins, Cucuzza, malabar spinach, and root veggies - rutabagas, beets, and swiss chard and kohlrabi. And peanuts. And corn. And funky eggplant and peppers.

Just keep on keeping on.

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Marilyn

"Make dirt, not war." eyo

Unabashed Liberal's picture

to hear that your kitten is well, now. (Know how super stressful it can be to have a very ill furbaby.)

As usual, enjoyed your interesting essay. Since I'm a lifelong vegetarian, can't add anything about fish markets, but, enjoyed reading about them.

(I'm one of those queasy folks who can't even look at any dead animal--including fryers, fish, etc., without almost losing my breakfast. Another reason I'm not much of a cook! Smile )

Having said that, I occasionally broke my own rules, and enjoyed Alaskan Halibut during our years in Fairbanks. Luved it!

BTW, thanks for the Cauliflower recipe--sounds delicious. And, right down our alley, so to speak. And, simple enough, that even I can manage to make it. I stick mostly to casseroles, roasting simple dishes, and crock pots. Mr M handles the more demanding dishes. He's an excellent cook.

Have a good one!

PleasantryMollie

“Dogs have given us their absolute all. We are the center of their universe. We are the focus of their love and faith and trust. They serve us in return for scraps. It is without a doubt the best deal man has ever made.
~~Roger Caras

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Everyone thinks they have the best dog, and none of them are wrong.

Anja Geitz's picture

@Unabashed Liberal

Actually my sick "kitten" is 14 years old. In addition to treating her hyperthyroidism of a few years, and subsequent heart arrhythmia, she's recently gone deaf, sleeps all the time due to the loss of that stimulus, and has contracted skin problems due to what I believe are environmentally related allergies.

We've been treating it by giving her an anti inflammatory to relive the itching, but I also had to give her antibiotics because she was licking and biting herself so furiously, her skin became infected. She is wearing a cone right now to prevent her licking and biting herself bloody and is trying to learn how to navigate her much smaller world with it on. She used to enjoy the outdoors but when she went deaf, that life is no longer possible. When she's a little better, I'm thinking of taking her in the garden on a leash, and even if she just sits down and doesn't move, at least she can enjoy the sights and smells. Right now I'm being challenged with getting the fleas under control. Big job. Will have to coordinate with her next flea treatment and do the house and all the cats at the same time. I'm just trying to give her all the relief I can from the itching, and obviously that includes fleas. I'm still in a state of worry. She's been through so much in that last few months, it grieves me terribly to watch her endure this.

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There is always Music amongst the trees in the Garden, but our hearts must be very quiet to hear it. ~ Minnie Aumonier

Unabashed Liberal's picture

@Anja Geitz

and empathy, Anja. I understand how her condition would cause you great concern. Hey, I sometimes have to be 'gone' several days, but, you have a sympathetic ear (with me)--I'm a PM, away. Smile

Think it'd be a great idea to let her visit the Garden, as soon as you can. We personally know the effect that the loss a sense (and, therefore, a stimulus) can have on a pet.

Two of our dogs lost their eyesight. One Springer lived to be 17-1/2--your couldn't tell she couldn't see. The PRA was so gradual, that, somehow, she never hit anything, and, mentally, never got depressed, at all.

Sadly, our dear terrier-mix suffered from Optical Blindness (caused from the onset of acute liver failure, that she later recovered from.) But, she was one of the unlucky ones, in that she never recovered her vision. The seizure was just too powerful. IOW, she went blind, in a split second. It broke our hearts--it was so hard on her, mentally and emotionally.

So, I think I have an idea of how difficult it must be--for you both. Please keep us updated. At least it's summer, so, maybe you can still enjoy the outdoors, together, on occasion. I hope so.

Sending positive karma to you both . . .

Give roseMollie

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Anja Geitz's picture

@Unabashed Liberal

I may take you up on your offer. I have so many feelings about her sudden deafness and all that she's lost, that I'm still processing it all. The worst, for me, is that she can no longer hear me. She was always so responsive to my voice, purring when I talked to her softly. Now I'm at a loss how I communicate with her. We do spend a lot of time snuggling and I take time each day to brush her which she loves, but she can't hear me tell her things will be alright. It's so terribly sad.

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There is always Music amongst the trees in the Garden, but our hearts must be very quiet to hear it. ~ Minnie Aumonier

thanatokephaloides's picture

@Anja Geitz

We do spend a lot of time snuggling and I take time each day to brush her which she loves, but she can't hear me tell her things will be alright. It's so terribly sad.

She may be deaf, but that signal is getting through loud and clear, I assure you.

Give rose

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"I say enough! If Israel wants to be the only superpower in the Middle East then they can put their own asses on the line and do it themselves. I want to continue to eat."
-- snoopydawg

Anja Geitz's picture

@thanatokephaloides

You are very kind. Your words helped a great deal. Kiss 2

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There is always Music amongst the trees in the Garden, but our hearts must be very quiet to hear it. ~ Minnie Aumonier

Unabashed Liberal's picture

@Anja Geitz @Anja Geitz

if you feel like it. Obviously, I can't guarantee that I'll have the 'right' words--but, I can assure you that I'll have some understanding of your distress. Everything does sound very much like what we went through, with our precious Murphee.

It is very sad. But, I agree with Sean, or, Than--your soft caress, or touch, 'signals your love for her.' You are both quite fortunate, I'd say.

Hope you get some nice days in the Garden together, real soon.

SmileMollie

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Anja Geitz's picture

@Unabashed Liberal

Thank you. Knowing that helps.

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There is always Music amongst the trees in the Garden, but our hearts must be very quiet to hear it. ~ Minnie Aumonier

QMS's picture

presently in Maine, learning about this spawning fish in the coastal rivers. The alewives have a remarkable ability to absorb phosphorus from the water (which causes algal bloom) caused by chemical fertilizers, then go out to the ocean and dissipate the chemicals. The locals use them mostly for bait fish, but smoking them kippered is a treat as well.

201807NextGeneration4.jpg

https://www.fishermensvoice.com/archives/201807AnotherGenerationDipsAlew...

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Listen to your higher mind.

Eagles92's picture

@QMS Where we learned about "pickled wrinkles" -- where "wrinkles" are whelks, or marine snails.

While I've tried escargot and liked it fine (especially when smothered in butter and broiled in cheese!), I couldn't bend my mind around what the texture of a pickled snail might be. So I stayed away!

Great to see you, Anja, and so glad to hear your kitty is on the mend. I'm swamped today so this is a fly-by, but I really enjoyed the topic. Hope to contribute more a little later!

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Anja Geitz's picture

@QMS

At one time alewives were so thick in Maine rivers that farmers could let their pigs eat them straight out of the water.

Interesting resource there, QMS. I guess this means you are acculturating yourself with the local color there in Maine, eh? Where abouts are you staying?

Many years ago I took a bike tour in Maine and spent some time in Castine and Bath. Both very picturesque places. When we were in Bath, we attended a Blue Grass Festival and something called a Firemen's Muster, which is a local competition of Firefighters using antique hand powered water hoses.

The things one sees when they travel, eh?

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There is always Music amongst the trees in the Garden, but our hearts must be very quiet to hear it. ~ Minnie Aumonier

QMS's picture

@Anja Geitz
About 30 miles west of Augusta.
Lots of forest and lakes, some hills. Few humans.
Today is turtle Tuesday. Reptiles stepping out and swimming by.
Wink

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Anja Geitz's picture

@QMS

But Maine is filled with lakes. Wow. The fishing there must be fantastic! Turtle Tuesday, eh? Good one Smile

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There is always Music amongst the trees in the Garden, but our hearts must be very quiet to hear it. ~ Minnie Aumonier

travelerxxx's picture

Although I have no fish recipes to share, in keeping with the (somewhat) nautical theme - what with Larkin's poetry and especially the sunset-over-the-bay photo - I will embed a tune from someone who's penned a good number of seafaring tunes.

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Anja Geitz's picture

@travelerxxx

Lightfoot can certainly tell a story. Glad you enjoyed the seafaring theme today. I was feeling a little salty today. Kiss 2

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There is always Music amongst the trees in the Garden, but our hearts must be very quiet to hear it. ~ Minnie Aumonier

thanatokephaloides's picture

The hot pan tip:

To prevent sticking, your pan must reach a temperature of 320 degrees Fahrenheit. How do you know when your pan has reached the right temperature? Here’s a tip: Drop ¼ tsp of water in your pan, if it does nothing, it’s too cold. If it bubbles and steams, it’s still too cold. If it forms into one bubble and glides along the pan, you’re ready to start pan frying.

is an application of the Leidenfrost effect, whereby a small pool of liquid hovers over a surface much hotter than the liquid's boiling point. The minimum temperature for this occurrence is constant for any given liquid, and for water it's approximately 379 degrees F. This is called "the Leidenfrost point".

Now, does anybody have any recipes for Schindleria praematurus??

Wink

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"I say enough! If Israel wants to be the only superpower in the Middle East then they can put their own asses on the line and do it themselves. I want to continue to eat."
-- snoopydawg

Pluto's Republic's picture

@thanatokephaloides

But, I did run across a detailed breakdown of all the unique ingredients used in the final dish:

.

The Leidenfrost effect was very helpful. Thanks for putting a name to that ingredient.

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The purpose of a writer is to keep civilization from destroying itself.
– Albert Camus
gulfgal98's picture

Today's offering sounds delicious. I have often mixed prepared brown mustard with a vinegarette and drizzled it over cooked cauliflower, but roasted sounds even better. And of course your sole is to die for. While not a vegetarian, I love fish and eat a lot of it, preferring it to meat or chicken.

I want to add that your writing of these memories and the foods you knew from various locations is delicious in itself. I think you should write a book.

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"I don't want to run the empire, I want to bring it down!" ~Dr. Cornel West

"Those who make peaceful revolution impossible will make violent revolution inevitable." John F Kennedy

Anja Geitz's picture

@gulfgal98

Good to see you. So glad you enjoyed the recipes! I brought leftovers to work yesterday and people oohed and aahed as if they had never seen a homemade meal before. Lol! Sometimes I share and the response is always encouraging.

Speaking of which, thank you for your kind comments about my writing. I've gotten a lot of encouraging feedback and have decided to start submitting my writing to magazines. Who knows, I may get published and paid as well. Wouldn't that be a hoot!

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There is always Music amongst the trees in the Garden, but our hearts must be very quiet to hear it. ~ Minnie Aumonier

your essay. The Dover Sole looks scrumptious. I'm not sure I can get Sole here so I may have to substitute. It looks like a thin white fleshed fillet. I'll see what I can find at our market. Thanks for the pro-tip as well.
Roasted cauliflower is a frequent dish on our menu, but I don't use mustard....will have to try that some time.
Bookmarking your fish recipe...thanks Anja.

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Anja Geitz's picture

@randtntx

I think the mustard adds a very nice flavor to the cauliflower. Yesterday I brought some leftovers into work and the response was almost hilarious, they were so surprised califlower could taste, well, good! Lol.

Love hearing you enjoyed the pro tip. When I learned that trick, my pan frying was so much less frustrating.

Glad you popped by!

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There is always Music amongst the trees in the Garden, but our hearts must be very quiet to hear it. ~ Minnie Aumonier

janis b's picture

I’m sorry your kitty has been unwell, and for the pain it causes you both. I hope things improve soon.

And thank you for your wonderful contributions, practically and memorably. It lead me to a very fond memory. My grandfather started most mornings at 4am down at the Fulton Fish Market where he bought fish to smoke and sell to the delis. He never took me with him to the market, but I did occasionally join him at his place of work where the fish were held and smoked. Sometimes he even went to Canada, Manitoba I think, to buy sturgeon. Because we spent every weekend either at home or in Brooklyn with our grandparents, breakfast always included smoked fish and/or my grandmother’s delicious ‘pickled lox and onions’, essentially cubed raw salmon, sliced onions, vinegar, sugar and peppercorns. To this day I still adore both, and occasionally smoke my own in a little portable smoker I have. Oddly enough, I don’t enjoy cooked fish. As I’ve mentioned before, sashimi and ceviche are my preferred style of fish. I'm not particularly fond of incense, but it can be effective in clearing the fishy smell left after cooking.

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Anja Geitz's picture

@janis b

Thanks for sharing Smile

I adore smoked fish, and your grandmothers pickled lox and onions sounds divine. I've been a pickled herring eater since I was a kid, so I can well imagine how tasty the lox were!

Funny how a place can stir up such wonderful feelings...

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There is always Music amongst the trees in the Garden, but our hearts must be very quiet to hear it. ~ Minnie Aumonier

mhagle's picture

@Anja Geitz @Anja Geitz

Pickled Northern Pike with Onions. To die for. Liked it even more than pickled herring which I adore. There is actually pretty good fishing in northeast South Dakota.

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Marilyn

"Make dirt, not war." eyo

travelerxxx's picture

Sent my non-c99er wife the link to this essay; she wants to make the Roasted Cauliflower! Yea! We both love cauliflower. Well, we love just about any veggie with few exceptions - turnips being one of the few.

Anyway, copied and pasted the Roasted Cauliflower instructions, with pix, into a word processing program and printed it up for her. We do need to hit the grocery for the Dijon mustard - we're out. Can't wait to try it!

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Anja Geitz's picture

@travelerxxx

Let me know how it turned out!

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There is always Music amongst the trees in the Garden, but our hearts must be very quiet to hear it. ~ Minnie Aumonier

travelerxxx's picture

@Anja Geitz

Will do. It may be a day or two, but we've got all the ingredients in stock, excepting the mustard. I'll post here to let you know how it went.

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Anja Geitz's picture

@travelerxxx

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There is always Music amongst the trees in the Garden, but our hearts must be very quiet to hear it. ~ Minnie Aumonier

travelerxxx's picture

@Anja Geitz

We finally got around to trying the Roasted Cauliflower this evening. I can tell you right now - it's a winner!

While we'd meant to have it before tonight, any cauliflower we procured keep getting pressed into other duties – salads, steamed ... all kinds of things. Glad we got it together though, as it was really worth it. I have to tell you, we did make a few minor changes.

While we were pretty faithful to your recipe, we had two departures. One change was made intentionally and another a bit by accident. First, and this is probably due to my dear wife being Sicilian-American, we doubled the garlic. So, rather than one head of roasted garlic, we used two. The other change was that we noticed we had cut our florets to a size about half that of yours. We probably shouldn't have done that. The size change messed with the cooking procedure a mite, but not so much that it even needs discussion. A further slight change was the addition of about a quarter teaspoon of kosher salt to the coating mixture. We may double that salt next time.

This wonderful dish was served with baked pork tenderloin, rubbed with "steakhouse rub," some nice grilled ciabatta bread, one side coated with my wife's butter/garlic spread. Before the meal we had a most delicious fresh salad. It was a memorable supper!

Although our doubling of the garlic to two heads might seem to some as overkill, the buttery, smooth flavor of roasted garlic was not nearly the radical change one might expect. It doubtless added to the garlic profile, but did so quite gently. There was no hint of any garlic "bite." We'll keep that change.

Thank-you so much for the recipe, Anja!

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Anja Geitz's picture

@travelerxxx

That sounds divine!

I am so glad you not only enjoyed the cauliflower, but made it your own Smile

I am always telling people who are trying out a new recipe, that tweaking and changing it to their own taste preference is what makes cooking fun and experimental!

Thank you so much for sharing your meal with me. I could almost taste it myself!

Now you must to try it on broccoli. Talk about Yummy...

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There is always Music amongst the trees in the Garden, but our hearts must be very quiet to hear it. ~ Minnie Aumonier

travelerxxx's picture

@Anja Geitz

We've some broccoli in the fridge, but it's spoken for. We'd made that great American dish, Catalina Chicken (which probably has dozens of other names), and we most often have it with broccoli and some type of brown/wild rice. There's always enough left for another meal. The uncooked broccoli is for that.

But, I think you're right - the Roasted Cauliflower recipe might work just fine with broccoli. Wife and I will cuss and discuss the matter and see whether we come up with a consensus.

***

While re-reading this reply, I debated whether to omit the word "just." Many decades ago, I either read or saw on television an interview with John Lennon. The line of dialoge was regarding the writing of songs, and Lennon was answering questions posed to him. I remember nothing but this: Lennon stated that "...anytime you find yourself using the word 'just' when writing, remove it. It's not needed." Or words close to that. So I agonized about whether to leave it or chuck it. Drives me crazy. Damn Lennon.

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Anja Geitz's picture

@travelerxxx

It's funny the things you remember, eh? Smile

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There is always Music amongst the trees in the Garden, but our hearts must be very quiet to hear it. ~ Minnie Aumonier