Mangiare in Italia

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The only real stumbling block is fear of failure.
In cooking you've got to have a what-the-hell attitude ~ Julia Child
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Buon Giorno!

Welcome to the Foodie Edition! Today we are going to take a culinary romp through the kitchens of Italy. So get ready to bite into the flavors of Tuscany with a roasted chicken that is so juicy you'll need a bib to eat it! Then, we'll head to the Amalfi coast where the seafood comes from the fishing boat to your plate! Molto buonissimo! Finally, back here in the States, an indulgent trip to my Mother's kitchen for a bowl of chicken soup and the comforts of home.

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A tavola non si invecchia ~ Italian proverb
At the table with good friends and family you do not grow old
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~ Le Vecchie Mura, San Gimignano ~

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Toccare il Cielo con un Dito

From a distance, San Gimignano appears like a mythical city resting quietly among the undulating curves of a Tuscan landscape. Visually striking with its medieval towers reaching up to the sky, people stroll beneath their shadows as they have for hundreds of years. Meandering along the narrow cobblestone streets, map in my hand, looking for a place to eat, I noticed two older women talking to each other from their second story windows just above me. On an impulse, I asked them if they knew a good place for lunch. After a few minutes of debate, they both agreed that I should go to Le Vecchie Mura. A family owned restaurant with breathtaking views of the countryside, it was, nonetheless, the roasted chicken that captured my full attention. Lips smacking and juice running down my chin, I devoured every last piece of meat on every last bone while Fiorella, the matriarch of the family, supplied the napkins. During dessert, I asked her how in god’s name did they get this chicken so juicy. Her answer? It was spatchcocked and marinated in lemon, wine, and rosemary. Once home, I practiced the technique and played with the flavors until I got an approximation of the lunch I had that day at Le Vecchie Mura.

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Roasted Lemon Garlic Rosemary Chicken
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Ingredienti

1 (4-5 pound) chicken
1/2 cup good olive oil
1 cup of white wine (I use TJ's Charles Shaw Sauvignon Blanc)
2 teaspoons grated lemon zest
1/3 cup freshly squeezed lemon juice
1 tablespoon minced garlic (3 cloves)
1 tablespoon minced fresh rosemary leaves
1 tsp freshly ground black pepper
2 lemons, halved
2 heads of garlic, with tops cut off
A few sprigs of rosemary leaves

Istruzioni

  1. Combine olive oil, lemon zest, lemon juice, wine, garlic, and rosemary, in a large measuring cup and set marinade aside
  2. ~

    pro tip chef hat2.jpgFor best results with your garlic presser, leave the skin on the garlic clove when you place it in the presser. This will allow you to lift the remains out of the garlic press in one whole piece which keeps the garlic from sticking in the holes.

    Also, if you do a lot of cooking, I strongly recommend investing in a good stainless steel garlic press. I bought my garlic press at Williams Sonoma 25 years ago and it's still working.

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  3. Remove Giblets from chicken
  4. Rinse chicken and then pat it dry with a paper towel
  5. Turn chicken over so that its breast is facing down and its back is facing up
  6. Spatchcock chicken
  7. ~
    How to Spatchcock a Chicken:
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  8. Sprinkle chicken with salt and pepper on each side and place inside a large zip-lock bag
  9. Pour marinade into zip-lock bag coating chicken
  10. Cut lemon in half and add to marinating chicken
  11. Refrigerate for at least 4 hours, or preferably overnight
  12. ~
    foodie feature marinating ck_0.jpg
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  13. Pre-heat oven to 450 degrees
  14. Take marinated chicken out of zip-lock back and arrange on top of a roasting rack inside large roasting pan
  15. Add 2 lemons cut in half, head of garlic with the top cut off, and a few sprigs of rosemary
  16. ~
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  17. Roast in oven until the skin is golden brown and a thermometer reads 165°F at the thickest part of the thigh and the breast , about 35 – 40 minutes
  18. Let chicken rest for 5 minutes once it's out of the oven
  19. Plate and serve
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Tutto finisce a tarallucci e vino ~ Italian proverb
It all ends with biscuits and wine (Everything will be okay)
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~ O Parrucchiano, Sorrento ~

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La Sirenetta Canora

Perched on a cliff high above the Mediterranean with stunning views across a glittering sea, Sorrento is one of those places you take into your heart and then leisurely relive in your daydreams. Known for its seafood and lemon groves, it’s also a great place for foodies. The trick is finding a good place to eat in a city catering to the tastes of tourists. This is where I got lucky. My boyfriend's cousin Gianni, who worked as a sous chef at O Parrucchiano, invited the both of us to lunch where he created an amazing meal from fresh langostino. Dining in what felt like a landscaped garden of an Italian Villa with wraparound gardens and floral terraces, we sat at a table nestled under a thicket of vines and lemon trees eating a pasta dish that could have made the mermaids sing. Creamy but not heavy, this sauce is lightened considerably by the lemons and pairs perfectly with the langostino. While I switched out the black pepper Gianni used for red pepper flakes, this lemon sauce also goes well with roasted broccoli, roasted asparagus, and, you guessed it, zoodles! Super easy to make with only a few ingredients, and no roux required, the key to this sauce is in the whisking!

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Creamy Lemon Parmesan Pasta with Langostino
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Ingredienti
16 oz farfalle pasta
2 Tbl lemon zest
1/3 cup lemon juice
½ tsp salt
1/4 tsp red pepper flakes
1/2 cup grated parmesan
2 cups heavy cream
2 1/2 cups cooked langostino

Istruzioni

  1. In a large pot of boiling salted water, add pasta and cook until al dente
  2. Drain the cooked pasta and set aside
  3. Clean out the pot and return to the stove
  4. Over medium heat add the cream, 1 Tbl lemon zest, ¼ tsp red pepper flakes, ½ tsp of salt and bring to a low boil
  5. Add in the cheese and lemon juice whisking until thickened and bubbly – this should take about 5 minutes. It’s important to keep whisking until the sauce is thickened, otherwise it will curdle.
  6. ~
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  7. Reduce the heat to low add in the cooked pasta, langostino and cook for 2-3 minutes.
  8. ~
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  9. Remove from the heat, taste for seasonings, adding a touch more salt if needed.
  10. Plate, garnish with 1 Tbl of lemon zest, and serve

Serves 4

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A good cook is like a sorceress who dispenses happiness ~ Elsa Schiaparelli
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~ Santa Monica Mountains, My Sister, Mom & Me ~

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My Mother's Kitchen

The most vivid memory I have of my Mother’s cooking is the warm chicken soup she used to pack in my thermos on rainy days. As a kid who would rather find a snack-pack pudding cup and a bag of Fritos in my lunch box, sadly, her efforts went largely unappreciated back then. Thinking back on the conversations I had with her about why neither of those things were ever going to show up in my school lunches, it was clear that her ideas about food clashed with the minute rice and T.V dinners that were being served on American dinner tables. She was both ahead of her time in terms of authentic food, and behind it in terms of the current zeitgeist of that era. Undeterred by what friends and neighbors did in their kitchens, my Mother made her own rules. Pencilled additions lined the pages of all her cookbooks because when she did follow a recipe, she usually changed it. Other times she winged it and created dinners out of whatever she had in the refrigerator. I spent a lot of time in the kitchen watching my Mother cook. From the wooden high-chair I once used as a baby that she had refashioned as a stool, I received my first cooking lessons. Whether she was showing me how to cut onions or cut up a chicken, I enjoyed watching her simply because she was most happy in the kitchen. Funny thing is, so am I. This chicken soup recipe is an adaption of one my Mother made when she got her first crockpot.

Thanks, Mom.

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Chicken Vegetable Soup
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Ingredients

1 Whole Chicken about 6-8 lbs
7 Celery Stalks
1 large Onion
3 tsp. Salt
½ tsp. Black Pepper
4 tsp TJ’s Herbs de’ Provence ~or~ 1 tsp each of Thyme, Marjoram, Sage, and Rosemary
1 Bay Leaf
3 cloves of garlic
3 cups of TJ’s organic chicken stock, or a good quality chicken stock
3 cups of water
1 cup of white wine (I use TJ's Charles Shaw Sauvignon Blanc)
1 cup of fingerling potatoes
1 cup of broccoli florets
1 cup of cauliflower florets
1 cup of sliced carrots

Instructions

  1. Cut 3 celery stalks in half and arrange them in the bottom of the crock pot
  2. Place the chicken on top of the celery
  3. Combine the salt, pepper and herb mixture together and sprinkle evenly inside and outside of the chicken
  4. Add the 3 cloves of garlic inside the chicken
  5. Place the lid on the crock pot and cook on low for 8-10 hours, checking to see if chicken is done around the 8 hour mark.
  6. (I typically start this part of the process at night before to going to bed, and then remove the chicken in the morning before starting the broth)
  7. ~
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  8. Take chicken out of the crock pot and let it cool
  9. Once the chicken has cooled, separate the meat from the bones.
  10. ~
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  11. Store the meat in a sealed container and refrigerate
  12. Place the bones back into the crock pot
  13. Quarter an onion, cut the remaining celery stalks in half, cut 4 loose carrots in half, and add to the crockpot, along with the broth, wine, water, and the bay leaf.
  14. ~
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  15. Cook an additional 6-8 hours on the low setting
  16. While the broth mixture is cooking prep the vegetables and then refrigerate (I suggest you cut your carrots on the thin side so they cook at the same time as your broccoli and cauliflower)
  17. When the broth has reached a golden color and the flavor has deepened, scoop out the bones and the vegetables with a slotted spoon
  18. Strain the broth with a cheese cloth and place in a dutch-oven pot, or a pasta pot
  19. Add the fingerling potatoes and cook on a medium heat for about 20 minutes, don’t overcook
  20. When the potatoes are just tender but not soft, add in the remaining vegetables and cook for about 15 minutes, again don’t over-cook them, stay close and keep testing them.
  21. Finally add in the chicken meat
  22. Plate and serve

Yields 10 cups

Serving Suggestions: Add a tsp of TJ’s garlic spread to your bowl of soup for extra flavor!

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La Canzone

~
In qualunque posto sarai
In qualunque posto sarò
Tra le cose che vivi
Io per sempre vivrò
~
~
Wherever you are
I will be there
Among the places you live
I will live forever
~
Well, that about wraps things up for this week's edition. Kiss 2
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Now it's your turn. Jump on in. The water's fine.
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Anja Geitz's picture

Good Morning Everyone!

What's cooking in your kitchen? Dance 4

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Play me another broken record Joe. Maybe then I'll learn why we pay twice as much for healthcare as everybody else in the world. ~ Not Henry Kissinger

Raggedy Ann's picture

I'm hungry! I'm going to be cooking this weekend! I've always wanted to know how to make great chicken soup and you've just given me a recipe I'm anxious to try!

I try a lot of roasted chicken recipes and I'll try yours too. Sounds yummy!

Trader Joes is my main grocery store, so I love that you let me know which TJ ingredient to use. Right on!

Have a beautiful day filled with yummy meals! Pleasantry

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“It is dangerous to be right in matters on which the established authorities are wrong.”

-- Voltaire

Anja Geitz's picture

@Raggedy Ann

A weekend of cooking, eh? Sounds like fun. Whatcha making? Biggrin

P.S. Can't tell you the big smile you put on my face when you answered my PM in Italian! Such a talented bunch of people we are here at C99. Love it!

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Play me another broken record Joe. Maybe then I'll learn why we pay twice as much for healthcare as everybody else in the world. ~ Not Henry Kissinger

Raggedy Ann's picture

@Anja Geitz
Bastianich on PBS. She says, "Tutti a tavola a mangiare!" which warms my heart! I'll be right there, Lidia!

What am I cooking this weekend? Well, your recipes, my dear! At least the roast chicken and the chicken soup. Mr. RA is lactose intolerant, so I miss out on cooking those wonderful creamy, cheesy dishes, sigh.

Anyhoo - I'm actually Hispanic, so mi casa es su casa, por favor, únete a todos en la mesa para comer!

Anytime you're in my area - let's cook together! PleasantryDrinks

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“It is dangerous to be right in matters on which the established authorities are wrong.”

-- Voltaire

Anja Geitz's picture

@Raggedy Ann

Would love to cook with you and learn some Spanish!

Funny story, years and years ago when Baja was still an undeveloped beach, my Sister and I camped out there along with her Guatamalan boyfriend. As temps reached into the 90's, when we weren't floating in the ocean, we were eating these delicious seafood cocktails in town. At one point, my Sisters boyfriend wanted to take a drive along the beach but I was too hot, saying in Spanish, "yo soy caliente".

My Sister and Joe just looked at each other and burst out laughing. Lol

P.S. Love Lidia as well. It's where I learned how make risotto.

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Play me another broken record Joe. Maybe then I'll learn why we pay twice as much for healthcare as everybody else in the world. ~ Not Henry Kissinger

Raggedy Ann's picture

@Anja Geitz
a hot mama?? Una chica caliente!

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“It is dangerous to be right in matters on which the established authorities are wrong.”

-- Voltaire

Anja Geitz's picture

@Raggedy Ann

Un chica caliente. Hahahaha!

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Play me another broken record Joe. Maybe then I'll learn why we pay twice as much for healthcare as everybody else in the world. ~ Not Henry Kissinger

thanatokephaloides's picture

...... a little nu jazz to go with all of today's yummies? A lot of it's Italian, too:

a celebration of sexy Italian ladies

but keep yourself together

private eyes

Creative cookery takes thought and inspiration. Some good brain food is called for. I recommend Caviar at 3 A.M:

followed by some Early Daiquiris for inspiration:

and maybe some Sisi Tartar:

Smile

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"I say enough! If Israel wants to be the only superpower in the Middle East then they can put their own asses on the line and do it themselves. I want to continue to eat."
-- snoopydawg

Anja Geitz's picture

@thanatokephaloides

Thanks so much for the tunes Smile

I think caviar at any time of day sounds good to me. Although, I've always been partial to eating it on a deviled egg. How about you?

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Play me another broken record Joe. Maybe then I'll learn why we pay twice as much for healthcare as everybody else in the world. ~ Not Henry Kissinger

thanatokephaloides's picture

@Anja Geitz

I think caviar at any time of day sounds good to me. Although, I've always been partial to eating it on a deviled egg. How about you?

Deviled eggs..... or crackers and cream cheese......

And champagne. And the love of one's life to share them with. Definitely de rigeur.!

Smile

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5 users have voted.

"I say enough! If Israel wants to be the only superpower in the Middle East then they can put their own asses on the line and do it themselves. I want to continue to eat."
-- snoopydawg

Anja Geitz's picture

@thanatokephaloides

Champagne and caviar would inspire anyone I think!

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Play me another broken record Joe. Maybe then I'll learn why we pay twice as much for healthcare as everybody else in the world. ~ Not Henry Kissinger

lotlizard's picture

@Anja Geitz  
(FX: radio melodrama organ sting)

https://ru.wikipedia.org/wiki/%D0%98%D0%BA%D1%80%D0%B0_%28%D0%BA%D1%83%D...

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thanatokephaloides's picture

@lotlizard

You know where caviar comes from though, don’tcha? — RUSSIA !!1!

Actually, RUSSIA!!11!! hasn't exported Caviar in a few years, at least not legitimately. CITES lists it as contraband because the Beluga Sturgeon (huso huso) is listed as critically endangered. And that's the Caspian Sea population. The population of huso huso in the Black and Mediterranean Seas is so endangered that any intentional killing of these fish is banned.

As the USA has now started aquaculture of huso huso, and Italy (!) already exports an excellent Beluga Hybrid caviar (huso huso x Acipenser baerii or Siberian sturgeon), the day will almost certainly come when Russia becomes a Caviar importing nation!

Beluga Hybrid is available at Marky's! While the first domestic Beluga Caviar will be available for purchase later this year, we have already started Beluga Hybrid sales right now. Beluga is the most famous and exclusive of all caviar, valued by foodies the whole world over. Marky's and our partners, Sturgeon Aquafarms, began the manufacture of domestic Beluga caviar in Florida; now it is the only Beluga aquafarm in the United States, while imports of Beluga caviar and Beluga meat are prohibited.

source

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3 users have voted.

"I say enough! If Israel wants to be the only superpower in the Middle East then they can put their own asses on the line and do it themselves. I want to continue to eat."
-- snoopydawg

QMS's picture

tapestry with your words zoebear! The descriptions and pictures seem to bring the places alive. Thanks for the spatchcock word. Knew the method but not the name. Chicken on the brain. Make the best of the day all.

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Listen to your higher mind.

Anja Geitz's picture

@QMS

Thanks for the spatchcock word

It's a good word isn't it? In Italian it's called pollo alla diavola. First time I can remember when I've preferred the English version to Italian. Biggrin

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Play me another broken record Joe. Maybe then I'll learn why we pay twice as much for healthcare as everybody else in the world. ~ Not Henry Kissinger

magiamma's picture

Same as it always is... Fist breakfast of forms of protein. Off to gym. Return to second breakfast of more protein choices. Go to fridge grab something. Repeat until full.

May check in later with XR news if there is anything interesting.

Have a good one everyone...

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Anja Geitz's picture

@magiamma

I like to start the day with celery juice. Going to the gym, not so much. Lol. Thanks for stopping by!

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Play me another broken record Joe. Maybe then I'll learn why we pay twice as much for healthcare as everybody else in the world. ~ Not Henry Kissinger

Eagles92's picture

Although I guess it's more like Three-Buck Chuck these days. Smile

I love Italy, though I've only visited Rome, Venice, Cortina, and Salina (off the coast of Sicily). Soooooooo much more to see, and eat!

I also love that you adapted your mother's recipe -- an apt nod to her favorite way of cooking.

Now I'm hungry!

Have a good day, all!

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Anja Geitz's picture

@Eagles92

One of the places on earth I think everyone should experience is definitely Italy. For the sights, the people, and especially the food.

A lot of people might be surprised to hear this, but Catherine de' Medici brought Italian cooking to France when she married into the Royal House in 1547 and became the Queen of France. Not only did she change the way the Aristocracy ate, but eventually, the way France ate as well, which is why the small food shops are structured the same way they are in Italy (i.e., dairy, meat, etc.,)

Interesting, eh?

Thanks for stopping by and Buon Appetito!

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Play me another broken record Joe. Maybe then I'll learn why we pay twice as much for healthcare as everybody else in the world. ~ Not Henry Kissinger

Eagles92's picture

@Anja Geitz Thanks for the history lesson! I've been to Paris and environs as well (many years ago), and never knew the connection.

Europeans, as a whole, certainly get the whole eating-and-drinking thing right!

Salud!

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Anja Geitz's picture

@Eagles92

Especially with their lunches during the work week.

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Play me another broken record Joe. Maybe then I'll learn why we pay twice as much for healthcare as everybody else in the world. ~ Not Henry Kissinger

thanatokephaloides's picture

@Anja Geitz

A lot of people might be surprised to hear this, but Catherine de' Medici brought Italian cooking to France when she married into the Royal House in 1547 and became the Queen of France. Not only did she change the way the Aristocracy ate, but eventually, the way France ate as well, which is why the small food shops are structured the same way they are in Italy (i.e., dairy, meat, etc.,)

Interesting, eh?

Indeed!

Civilization and culture have always flowed from Italy to France (SPQR! SPQR! SPQR!) as culture and civilization flowed into Italy from Greece.

Smile

p.s.: For those who don't recognize the symbol, "SPQR" is "Senatus Populusque Romanorum", (Senate and People of the Romans) and is to the original Roman Empire what "USA" is to "The United States of America in Congress Assembled".

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2 users have voted.

"I say enough! If Israel wants to be the only superpower in the Middle East then they can put their own asses on the line and do it themselves. I want to continue to eat."
-- snoopydawg

skod's picture

We made my wife's wonderful Bolognese and homemade tagliatelle over the weekend and had it last night, after doing Osso Bucco and a lemon risotto for easter dinner. Life as we know it would not be possible without pasta, arborio rice, and maybe 15 or 20 other pantry staples. Oh, and alcohol. Lots and lots of alcohol.

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Anja Geitz's picture

@skod

Ya can't beat a good Bolognese. I learned how to make this lovely sauce while I was living in Florence from a woman who came from a small town near Bologna. The key, she told me, was to brown the meat, giving the sauce it's rich flavor. She accomplished this by cooking it in small batches to avoid boiling it when the meat released all those juices as it warmed. Worked like a charm.

Your weekend of cooking sounds very similar to mine. Lots of leftovers! Biggrin

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Play me another broken record Joe. Maybe then I'll learn why we pay twice as much for healthcare as everybody else in the world. ~ Not Henry Kissinger

skod's picture

@Anja Geitz Yup. We love doing the big weekend cook, and then having good grab-and-go lunches for the week. Sunday is usually big-cook day. This week Italian, next week Caribbean: I need some pepper pot, ground provision, and saltfish and bake... Now we just gotta find good Lambi in Denver. Maybe H-Mart.

We spent a couple weeks in Tuscany a few years back, in a little villa just outside Panzano in Chianti. The food and wine was amazing, as you'd expect. But by far the best thing of all was going to Dario Cecchini's little butcher shop pretty much every day for our daily ration of protein, bawdy Italian song, and the odd obscenity. "Heat" by Bill Buford had just come out, in which he described Mario Batali's interactions with the mad butcher, and we had to go see for ourselves if that was all real- so it must have been 2005 or 2006. It was wonderful. He'd hew off chunks of prosciutto with that great huge machete or halberd or whatever you'd call that *weapon* of his, and sling them across the counter to whoever was there (when he was in a good mood, anyway): "Carne!".

Back then, there were just the locals coming through for their daily shopping, and he was only really famous locally. I imagine we'd never be able to even get near the place now- but it is a blast to see him pop up on the tube nowadays. Who knew?

One edit: typos. Really gotta learn how to type someday.

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Anja Geitz's picture

@skod

Great book

"Heat" by Bill Buford had just come out, in which he described Mario Batali's interactions with the mad butcher,

If I remember correctly, Bill Buford opened his book with a description of buying a whole pig in Chinatown, wrapping it up in plastic, throwing it on the back of his motorcycle and driving it through the streets of Manhattan in wee hours of the morning, dripping blood as he went along.

I can't think of any story that would've viscerally set the tone of his book better than that one.

So lovely to meet a fellow foodie who had the great fortune to experience Italy in the way you did. Few culinary experiences can match it.

Happy, happy cooking!

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Play me another broken record Joe. Maybe then I'll learn why we pay twice as much for healthcare as everybody else in the world. ~ Not Henry Kissinger

skod's picture

@Anja Geitz There's literally nothing like immersing yourself in a new food culture. I miss that a lot, like the simple joys of walking for 10 minutes and buying everything every day (or perhaps every other), rather than sitting in stopped traffic on an interstate to lay in Costco palletfuls of this and that...

IMNSHO, the only way to travel is to go native: eat where the locals eat, shop where they shop, sip wine where they sip, stop and smell the sauces wafting out of windows. We Americans do everything at such a breakneck speed, and with such unstoppable determination, that we not only miss too much- many of us never even know how much there is to miss.

Thanks for the very cool recipes: they are going into the queue! And have a great day.

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Anja Geitz's picture

@skod

the only way to travel is to go native: eat where the locals eat, shop where they shop, sip wine where they sip, stop and smell the sauces wafting out of windows.

When I was staying in Venice, I had all of my windows facing a quite canal. While taking a nap before going out to dinner one evening, I could hear the metal sound of cutlery hitting the plates as people in the neighborhood were eating their dinners. Sound carrying over water, it was an experience, I think, very unique to Venice. Simply, unforgettable in its lovely simplicity.

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Play me another broken record Joe. Maybe then I'll learn why we pay twice as much for healthcare as everybody else in the world. ~ Not Henry Kissinger

detroitmechworks's picture

From my copy of "Joy of Cooking".

It's actually kinda fun to whip up something decent from the end of the month leftovers. Hell, I've recently even been making Hamburger Helper taste good. These are the kinds of things I wish I'd been taught in school. How to ignore a manufacturer's instructions if you can do it better. Smile

Take Hamburger Helper for example. The instructions want it all made in a single pan, and it's designed for that. I ignore that, use two pans, and prepare the sauce and noodles separately before combining. I also completely ignore their portion suggestions and method for making sauce. Half the time I only end up using HALF the spices they suggest, and cutting it with real cheese, milk and butter. Because I have this thing about food... I like it to be real.

Scratch cooking does take longer, I admit, but I wish I'd been offered the chance to take Home Ec in high school. Wouldn't have been READY for it, looking back, but wish I'd had the chance. The societal insistence on "Marketable" skills has been around forever, but I'm amazed how useful skills have been abandoned because "It's so much EASIER" to do things quickly and cheaply.

I always wished that Star Trek would do an episode where people who were obsessed with doing things the Easy way were put into a situation where all their vaulted knowledge is useless. Yes, I would rewrite "Arena". ("Got him! Hit him with a bunch of rocks!") Sometimes the simple and hard solution is the best one. All that time hunting for cannon parts could have avoided with a simple deadfall or some Punji sticks. (Yes, I know they're banned. I find that most of the "Rules" of warfare tend to favor the rich.)

WOW. Long digression on doing things the old fashioned way. Smile

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I do not pretend I know what I do not know.

Pluto's Republic's picture

@detroitmechworks

I always thought, after college or any formal learning, there should be a two-year Finishing School for humans.

That's where you learn all the stuff that nobody ever tells you — but knowing it makes life so much better and more empowered. Things like manners and survival skills. Understanding food and ingredients and cooking methods. Learning to learn in the real world and learning to heal the body with traditional medicine, with food, and with the mind. Learning how to be tidy and how to be organized. Learning to be photogenic and the art of conversation. How to find a mentor. How to spot the most important person in the room. How to introduce yourself and others. How to express sympathy, gratitude, and how to say no. How to "read" people. Learning to journal, to control your thoughts, to set priorities. Learning how to be a friend and how to leave things better than you found them. How to protect yourself in the world. Learning what is expected from someone who is a good human being.

Stuff like that. Plus how to do your laundry.

Finishing School.

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The purpose of a writer is to keep civilization from destroying itself.
– Albert Camus
detroitmechworks's picture

@Pluto's Republic

“A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion, butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders, give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.”

I'd add a few to that list and then some. But the first would be... Make tools. Smile To be human you need to be able to make the tools you need to do everything else. If you can't replicate it, you shouldn't get the chance to break it.

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I do not pretend I know what I do not know.

Pluto's Republic's picture

@detroitmechworks

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The purpose of a writer is to keep civilization from destroying itself.
– Albert Camus
detroitmechworks's picture

@Pluto's Republic So, neighbor had a bunch of salvage that he grabbed from a dump site. (I'm pretty sure some of it is stolen, and the landlord has been over to scream at them to get rid of it twice now. Short version, He was selling scrap and parts CHEAP. Plans to do a garage sale, and most of the best bits have already found their way to various pawn shops...)

Anyhoo, I'm at the point where I just asked if they had any items I might be interested in. Apparently whoever dumped this stuff had an extensive gunsmithing shop. Since I have no interest in guns, I agreed to pay forty bucks for some of the stuff I can use. Two propane burners, A professional Angle Grinder, A extensive set of metal files, and enough quality junk scrap to make at least three or four projects. (Including a huge piece of high carbon steel that looks like it was part of a dock tie up.)

Sometimes you put something out to the universe, and things happen. Now just to find a frame and some firebrick... (I'm not going to push my luck and wish for free propane. Smile )

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I do not pretend I know what I do not know.

Anja Geitz's picture

@detroitmechworks

Improvising in cooking is the way I've always discovered new things. Sounds like you've figured out what works.

My Mom did the same thing when she'd make Mac n' Cheese from "the box" starting first with an onion based bechamel sauce and then turning it into a Mornay sauce as she added cheese.

So, I always took my cues from her in the kitchen and it's worked out pretty good for me.

Happy cooking!

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Play me another broken record Joe. Maybe then I'll learn why we pay twice as much for healthcare as everybody else in the world. ~ Not Henry Kissinger

detroitmechworks's picture

@Anja Geitz Four cheese quesadilla tacos with multiple meats...

Alfredo pizza with havarti.

Peanut butter and jelly and apple slices.

What's behind freezer door number ONE? Smoothies...

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I do not pretend I know what I do not know.

Anja Geitz's picture

@detroitmechworks

My latest smoothie is vanilla flavored almond milk and frozen cherries. Yum. Also really good for the summer is frozen pineapple and TJ's organic coconut milk in a can. Marvelous. All you need is a little run and an umbrella! Lol.

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Play me another broken record Joe. Maybe then I'll learn why we pay twice as much for healthcare as everybody else in the world. ~ Not Henry Kissinger

enhydra lutris's picture

somewhere, though I'll probably modify them. We went to and enjoyed San Gimignana, but I don't recall what we ate or where. We might've even picnicked, which we do a lot on the road - local foodstuffs, some local wine, a good knife and someplace to sit makes for many a wonderful lunch.

The chicken is interesting, I always use a rub of my own devise and roast whole on an old weber kettle. I mke things self basting by using a wok half-full of cheap wine mixed with water for a drip pan and load fresh picked herbs from the garden on the coals so that everything is bathed in smoke. Body cavity of fowl is usually filled with cheap port. I spatchcock birds in order to do them on a small portable gas grill, which is rare, but I like the idea of doing spatchcocked chicken in the oven - that'll work for rainy or very cold days. The marinade is intriguing because we have a lemon tree.

The soup looks pretty interesting even though it does have cauliflower - worth at least one try. I usually make my own stock but do keep some packaged for emergencies when I'm out or using a lot of it (making risotto). Can't help but wonder how that would adapt to an instant pot for the first one or two stages.

making me hungry.

Have a great one.

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That, in its essence, is fascism--ownership of government by an individual, by a group, or by any other controlling private power. -- Franklin D. Roosevelt --

Anja Geitz's picture

@enhydra lutris

Your chicken sounds amazing! Wine is a wonderful addition to most anything, but I never thought to use port. Brilliant!

A friend of mine has used my chicken soup recipe in her insta-pot, adjusting the times a little. I think the first time you may have to play it by ear, but after that, it should work fine.

Buon Appetito, my friend!

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Play me another broken record Joe. Maybe then I'll learn why we pay twice as much for healthcare as everybody else in the world. ~ Not Henry Kissinger

Lookout's picture

...both I guess would be the way to go. Just returned from trade day and I usually go grocerying while in town (15 miles away). They had an organic chicken on sale. I have it in the pan simmering now. Destined for soup. My Mom was a package and can cook. I started cooking as a scout. I watched Julia and met Jacques Pepin, who is the most fun to watch cook. Anyway over the years I've learned to cook simply and inexpensively. When you live in the boonies, going out to eat isn't the quick option. And I like my own cooking better than most meals I eat out.

Here's a bit of advice (from some buddies)...

Thanks for the delicious OT Zoe, Bon Appetit

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“Until justice rolls down like water and righteousness like a mighty stream.”

Anja Geitz's picture

@Lookout

I watched Julia and met Jacques Pepin, who is the most fun to watch cook.

Oh, gosh you made me smile reading that! How marvelous for you!

I too enjoy watching him cook. Years ago he did a show with Julia, and I can't remember enjoying anything more in the way of cooking shows than watching those two collaborate. In fact I bought the book they did together. Some fantastic recipe and beautiful pictures.

Ah, yes. Julia and Jacques. Clearly a cooking duo who enjoyed working together. Even the affectionate banter between them on their cooking show was a sheer joy to watch.

Thanks for that lovely memory.

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Play me another broken record Joe. Maybe then I'll learn why we pay twice as much for healthcare as everybody else in the world. ~ Not Henry Kissinger

how small things remain in our memory and can be recalled so vividly, like a bowl of soup. I love the story about your mom and the picture of the three of you picnicking. You make me want to pull out some of the old pictures I have. My mom was also a wonderful cook and relished making recipes from all over the world. I remember coming home from school and finding drying pasta noodles on the backs of all the kitchen chairs and every surface was covered with homemade drying noodles. Those meals were so good. My mother used to make an Italian almond cookie for desert with this meal. I'll see if I can scare that recipe up and post it here.

Your description of your Italy trips are wonderful. I would so enjoy eating at O Parrucchiano's amongst the wraparound garden and most especially the vines and lemon tree trellis.

I think Julia would approve.

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enhydra lutris's picture

@randtntx
they are super fantastic but a bit of a bear to make, and require almond flour to boot. I have a recipe somewhere too.

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That, in its essence, is fascism--ownership of government by an individual, by a group, or by any other controlling private power. -- Franklin D. Roosevelt --

@randtntx It is true many of us have fond memories of our mother's cooking. My mother was an excellent cook and D.O.'s mother as well. For me and my sister's though, our most enduring memory was after my mother wrote to Betty Crocker about a recipe in the cookbook that was not as it said it would be. She got a letter in response asking her to be a Betty Crocker recipe tester. They paid for the supplies and we got to eat the recipe being tested. Anytime a new dish appeared on the table, the question would be asked, "is this a Betty Crocker?"

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Life is what you make it, so make it something worthwhile.

This ain't no dress rehearsal!

@jakkalbessie about your mom. I'm always happy when women of that era received recognition for some of the many things they did so well (I maintain women should have been paid for all the work they did at home). Smile

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Anja Geitz's picture

@jakkalbessie

Nice story. Just goes to show the power of a well written letter. Especially about a subject you know a thing or two about! Good for your Mom!

Thanks for sharing Smile

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Play me another broken record Joe. Maybe then I'll learn why we pay twice as much for healthcare as everybody else in the world. ~ Not Henry Kissinger

Anja Geitz's picture

@randtntx

Beautiful soup. Biggrin

I remember coming home from school and finding drying pasta noodles on the backs of all the kitchen chairs and every surface was covered with homemade drying noodles...

What a visual. What a memory. It's true about the place those special dishes our Mothers made have in our hearts. They never leave us. Thanks for sharing your sweet memory with us randtntx.

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Play me another broken record Joe. Maybe then I'll learn why we pay twice as much for healthcare as everybody else in the world. ~ Not Henry Kissinger

Pluto's Republic's picture

Your recipes are fantastic, Zoe. I mean it. I love your rustic approach, and your ingredients that tend toward the absolutely essential and specific. That's what gives them an authentic edge.

Very good advice at the top:

The only real stumbling block is fear of failure.
In cooking you've got to have a what-the-hell attitude

The chicken reminds me of "chicken under a brick." Similar ingredients, except for the brick. One of my favorites. I've been getting ruthless with ingredients, lately. I make them audition again in recipes and prove their value — or I cross them off for the sake of simplicity. lol. Also learning to cook with spices. (Herbs I know.) Spices are intoxicating, hence the Spice Road, which transformed global civilizations. I want to know spices intuitively, like a painter knows colors, and then be able to go all Yosemite Sam with them in the kitchen. Spicy recipes tend to have A LOT of ingredients — (perhaps from tradition or sentimentality) so my work is cut out for me. I want to learn to cook the way a musician plays — all instinct — no sheet music; no recipes.

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The purpose of a writer is to keep civilization from destroying itself.
– Albert Camus
Anja Geitz's picture

@Pluto's Republic

I've been getting ruthless with ingredients, lately. I make them audition again in recipes and prove their value

I just thought of a waiting room filled with vegetables trying to remember their lines. Lol. Thanks for that!

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Play me another broken record Joe. Maybe then I'll learn why we pay twice as much for healthcare as everybody else in the world. ~ Not Henry Kissinger

Eagles92's picture

@Pluto's Republic Go to Morocco. The spices you find in the souks are beyond compare.

And so much more affordable than we have here in the U.S.

Such an eye-opener!

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Pluto's Republic's picture

@Eagles92

Spices have a lot of medicinal properties, too. Perhaps I'll look into cooking schools in Morocco. Everywhere you go has cooking schools and language schools. They suck you right into the inside culture. It's great for solo travelers.

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The purpose of a writer is to keep civilization from destroying itself.
– Albert Camus
Anja Geitz's picture

@Pluto's Republic

In the home of a woman who was putting together her own cookbook. She was the wife of one of my instructors when I was going to school in Florence. Great way to learn about the food of the region as well as the language. And we ate our "work" in her garden afterwards!

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Play me another broken record Joe. Maybe then I'll learn why we pay twice as much for healthcare as everybody else in the world. ~ Not Henry Kissinger

wendy davis's picture

@Pluto's Republic

considering emigrating to morrocco? whooosh, if so. i'd learned a few moroccan dishes to serve to our son's (then GF's family) as papa was morocann; spices similar to east indian (cumin, fenugreek, etc), plus a lot of lemon juice.

but i keep this 'spices as medicines' list at an over-flow free word press site. seems i haven't updated it again since 2016, but it may help a bit, and has other helpful hints besides spices.

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Anja Geitz's picture

@Eagles92

Who is married to a girl from the Philippines. About a week ago he brought in a dessert she made from avocados. Ice cream to be exact. It was marvelous. For those who do enjoy avocados, they pair surprisingly well with cream and sugar. Chilled.

It gave me ideas. Wink

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Play me another broken record Joe. Maybe then I'll learn why we pay twice as much for healthcare as everybody else in the world. ~ Not Henry Kissinger

..."spatchcock chicken" is what we refer to as "butterfly chicken" around here.

Our soup recipe is quite similar to yours, but we often substitute homemade egg (whites, only) noodles, instead of the potatoes. (We add the noodles as we use/reheat the soup, since the pasta has a tendency to overwhelm the soup when it's left in it for an extended period of time.)

We also make a similar pasta dish--appears to be a variation of Alfredo, generally speaking--but we use scallops and shrimp instead of langostinos.

Bonnie and I are due for a self-guided tour of Italy soon. We've been talking about it for a couple of years. It's definitely on our bucket list.

As usual, Zoe, another outstanding foodie piece. Thanks so much for your time, effort, and skillful narrative. Your posts really are wonderful. I don't know if you've considered it, but your knowledge of the subject matter, as reflected in your writing, appears--to me, anyway--to be "professional grade."

Go for it!!!

And, thanks again!

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"Freedom is something that dies unless it's used." --Hunter S. Thompson

Pluto's Republic's picture

@bobswern

(We add the noodles as we use/reheat the soup, since the pasta has a tendency to overwhelm the soup when it's left in it for an extended period of time.)

Thanks, bob. I keep forgetting that about noodles. Yet is is something I know well about pasta.

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The purpose of a writer is to keep civilization from destroying itself.
– Albert Camus
skod's picture

@Pluto's Republic Hey, here's a funky thing to try: if you have a local Chinese place with decent hot-and-sour, think about doing the pan-ethnic ramen thing. Cook up some ramen noodles (omitting the "flavor" packets, of course), and serve the H&S over them (extra points if you also add a couple softboiled eggs). It's a great way to reheat extra H&S, and leads to all sorts of of other noodlesperimentation. Which will inevitably lead you to reinvent jjamppong, but _that's_ a story for another day...

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@skod

...I'm definitely going to check this out over the next couple of weeks! Great idea! Maybe do up some dumplings (while we've attempted to make 'em on our own, we opt for the frozen Ling-Ling brand, sold at CostCo and elsewhere, most of the time) and put them in, as well!!!

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"Freedom is something that dies unless it's used." --Hunter S. Thompson

thanatokephaloides's picture

@skod

if you have a local Chinese place with decent hot-and-sour, think about doing the pan-ethnic ramen thing. Cook up some ramen noodles (omitting the "flavor" packets, of course), and serve the H&S over them (extra points if you also add a couple softboiled eggs). It's a great way to reheat extra H&S, and leads to all sorts of of other noodlesperimentation.

What is this "leftover hot-and-sour soup" thing you keep describing? Wink

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"I say enough! If Israel wants to be the only superpower in the Middle East then they can put their own asses on the line and do it themselves. I want to continue to eat."
-- snoopydawg

skod's picture

@thanatokephaloides Hee, hee, hee... When it looks like it is going to snow and we aren't in a cooking mood midweek, we'll buy 2 quarts- one to have right away with our takeout feast, and one to keep back for ramenizing. In order for us to have any leftover H&S, we have to plan ahead. But I understand exactly what you are saying!

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Anja Geitz's picture

@skod

One of the things I miss about living in New York City. Used to live across a great takeout place. Sometimes when I came home late after work, I'd order their sesame noodles. From my kitchen window I could see them pick up the phone. In the time it took me to get into my PJ's, they were buzzing my door. New York living.

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Play me another broken record Joe. Maybe then I'll learn why we pay twice as much for healthcare as everybody else in the world. ~ Not Henry Kissinger

Anja Geitz's picture

@bobswern

I have had heard of spatchcocking being referred to a butterflying, but in the end, I thought, what's more fun to say? Spatchcock or butterfly? Biggrin depends on who you ask, I guess. Lol.

Although, I'm not sure my German Mother would've agreed, homemade egg white noodles sounds like a lovely substitution to the soup instead of potatoes. You and Bonnie sound like the kind of foodies I wouldn't mind breaking bread and wine with! Pity I don't live in Manhattan anymore.

Thanks for your kind words, Bob, and your astute observation. It's a pleasure for me to do. My friends and family get to eat well, and I get to do what I love, and share it with others.

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Play me another broken record Joe. Maybe then I'll learn why we pay twice as much for healthcare as everybody else in the world. ~ Not Henry Kissinger

@Anja Geitz

...we spent a week in the Montecito area quite awhile ago, and we've always discussed going back there. Occasionally--maybe once every 5 to 10 years--we do make it out to the West coast. And, seriously, if you're ever within 50 miles of NYC, we'd LOVE to get together with you for a nice dinner. That'd be awesome. I can already tell we'd have a great time! Thanks again for your posts!

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"Freedom is something that dies unless it's used." --Hunter S. Thompson

wendy davis's picture

but i do cook a hella lot. traditional mexican, puerto rican, chinese and italian are my go-to's most often, but i've ben branching out into thai and east indian (for the healthy as hell indian spices).

iirc, i learned this from lidia bastianich first, but rather than copy from my recipe card i grabbed and modified this online link for:

italian orange cornmeal cake

Ingredients

• 1/2 cup (slut) olive oil plus more for pan
• 2 large eggs
• 1/2 cup dry white wine (or orange juice)
• 1 1/4 cups all-purpose flour spooned and leveled
• 1/2 cup yellow cornmeal
• 2 teaspoons baking powder
• 1 teaspoon salt
• Finely grated zest of 1 orange (a microplane zester makes it easy)
• mandarin oranges
• 1 c. sugar
Directions

1. Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Brush bottom and sides of an 8-inch round cake pan with oil; line bottom with a round of parchment paper, and brush paper with oil.
2. In a large bowl, whisk together oil, eggs, 1 cup sugar, and wine until smooth. Add flour, cornmeal, baking powder, salt, and orange zest; beat on low speed gently to combine.
3. Pour batter into prepared pan. Bake until cake begins to pull away from sides of pan and a tester inserted in center comes out clean, 35 to 40 minutes.
4. Cool in pan 20 minutes. Run a knife around edge of cake; invert cake gently onto a plate, and remove parchment paper. Reinvert cake onto a rack to cool completely.

Garnish with canned mandarin oranges and some the juice. i make three at a time so i can gift a couple...

so many of you have been to italy, i'm both a bit envious and surprised, although my only desire was to got to florence...totally for the art. i have books and books of italian artists and art...

nice vignettes, zobear. but as to your julia child quote? here's another of her chicken recipes: ; )

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Anja Geitz's picture

@wendy davis

Wonderful recipe! I especially love the Orange twist to the cornbread. I like using citrus not only in my cooking, but my baking as well.

Italy. I was lucky. Decided to go there when I was young and had no responsibilities. There are still places I'd like to go, but that's for another essay....

Btw, I think anyone who cooks, is a foodie. And I'm glad you enjoyed the stories Smile

Thanks for stopping by!

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Play me another broken record Joe. Maybe then I'll learn why we pay twice as much for healthcare as everybody else in the world. ~ Not Henry Kissinger

wendy davis's picture

@Anja Geitz

it's and italian cake, not a cornbread. but nah, i've never cared for the term 'foodie', myownself.

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Anja Geitz's picture

@wendy davis

Even better. Cake! Sounds delish.

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Play me another broken record Joe. Maybe then I'll learn why we pay twice as much for healthcare as everybody else in the world. ~ Not Henry Kissinger

wendy davis's picture

@Anja Geitz

you never said if you'd admired julia's personal touch to that chicken recipe. ; )

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Anja Geitz's picture

@wendy davis

I love ya Wendy! Classic piece. Seen it many times before and a hilarious addition to my cooking segment and my Julia quote. Biggrin

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Play me another broken record Joe. Maybe then I'll learn why we pay twice as much for healthcare as everybody else in the world. ~ Not Henry Kissinger

Wonderful thread, like a little journey unto itself. What a great way to get away from the world's worries for a while. Zoebear, your chicken recipes look absolutely delicious and doable, especially with the enthusiasm and care you put into sharing them. And it's nice to glimpse other sides to people whose political intelligence I've long admired. So many foodies here, who would have guessed?

Thank you for putting all this together, Zoebear. Beautiful job. Smile

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Anja Geitz's picture

@laurel

So good to "see" you here. Glad you enjoyed the Italian memories. I do so enjoy telling them! Lol.

Thanks for the feedback. I've received similar sentiments about these OT's from different people here which encourages me. Not just because I like hearing people say nice stuff about my writing, (I mean, ok, I like that too, lol) but bc taking a break sometimes and getting to know people in a different light can be a very welcome treat. We have such a wonderful collection of interesting people here with quirky sense of humors that always lightens the mood. Glad it lightened your mood too!

Have a great day, Lauren. Biggrin

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Play me another broken record Joe. Maybe then I'll learn why we pay twice as much for healthcare as everybody else in the world. ~ Not Henry Kissinger

mimi's picture

One day I will cook by cookbook and recipes. Until then I just throw in all things I have left in the fridge and make it spicy. So you just taste the spiciness and not the poor quality food.... Sigh. So far me and my co-eaters survived.

Thanks Zoebear, I bow down to your wonderful write.up of all the recipes. I lived for a good year in Rome and was poor over there. Seldom I enjoyed the good stuff in restaurants like the so-called richer touristy folks. But I found tasty little stuff everywhere, which I just could bite into on the go. Always a joy.

My son was the only one who picked up Italian as a child. Me nada. Husband English and French only, So we wasted our time in Italy not getting out of it what we were supposed to.It was also the place I met American and Canadians, who felt very lonely in Rome and were quite homesick to the US.

So, every person has his own stories.

This is for you from me for your recipes.
Kiss 3

PS Can't embed with sound. Don't know why. Sigh.

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TTTT (too tired to talk)

Anja Geitz's picture

@mimi

Thanks for the very sweet and funny video. Italians do take their lunches seriously!

I think it might be Rome nod not you. When I stayed there, I was a bit lonely too.

I never really had a lot of money while in Italy. I was going to school there and lived with a family. I did have a boyfriend who wasn't hurting for money, but I wouldn't call him wealthy either. I just got real lucky with some of my eating experiences. Which is where I'd spend what money I had.

Thanks for stopping by dear Mimi!

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Play me another broken record Joe. Maybe then I'll learn why we pay twice as much for healthcare as everybody else in the world. ~ Not Henry Kissinger

thanatokephaloides's picture

@mimi

PS Can't embed with sound. Don't know why. Sigh.

The sound on your embed is working OK here.....

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"I say enough! If Israel wants to be the only superpower in the Middle East then they can put their own asses on the line and do it themselves. I want to continue to eat."
-- snoopydawg

WoodsDweller's picture

Looks like this is our current open thread, maybe one of you smart people can tell me how this works.

Sanders has rolled $14 million (IIRC) from his Senate campaign fund (and probably his Presidential campaign as well) into his current Presidential campaign. O'Rourke rolled $7 million from his Senate race. Etc.

When a Presidential candidate picks a running mate, I would assume that the running mate is expected to roll whatever campaign funds he has into the joint campaign. When the two of them are raising money, it all goes into the joint campaign. Any remaining funds goes into the reelection campaign.

When the President leaves office there may be some remaining campaign funds. Probably in fact.

What claim, if any, does his Vice President have on those funds?

If your Vice President decides to run, as many do, is he expecting those funds to be available to start him off? Is that at the discretion of the President (he controls the funds)? That would make his endorsement doubly important.

I've been wondering why Biden has been standing around with his thumb up his butt instead of entering the race. Could it be that he had been expecting many millions from the Obama-Biden campaign to come his way, but Obama has declined to release them?

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"I cannot ignore reality, but I can embrace beauty." -- magiamma

@WoodsDweller Breaking news today...Biden's announcing Thursday (day after tomorrow), via video; and, then formally, in Pittsburgh this coming/next Monday (in front of a large firefighters audience). Just Google it. It's been all over the press for the past 6 or 8 hours. As for the technical stuff on the V.P.'s funds, etc., I don't have a clue!

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"Freedom is something that dies unless it's used." --Hunter S. Thompson

travelerxxx's picture

This Open Thread is making me hungry!!!

Thanks zoebear and commenters!

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Anja Geitz's picture

@travelerxxx

Glad you enjoyed the recipes! Had a lot of fun making them. Family and friends had a lot of fun eating everything. I'm already planning something very special to kick off the summer in my next foodie edition. Makes me smile just thinking about it. Wink

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Play me another broken record Joe. Maybe then I'll learn why we pay twice as much for healthcare as everybody else in the world. ~ Not Henry Kissinger

travelerxxx's picture

@Anja Geitz

My dear wife, whose parents were born in Sicily, was quite interested in these recipes. She'll probably modify them — as she does with nearly all — but you've piqued her interest. She's not a c99 reader unless I send a link ... and I did.

Gonna be fun reading the next installment! Thank-you for your work here!

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Anja Geitz's picture

@travelerxxx

And Thank you for sharing my link. I've sent my foodie links to friends at work who like to cook and a few of them who have wondered out loud about our political community. I tell them, yeah, we're frustrated socialists. Mind you, they weren't unkind or anything, just surprised that the recipes came with, er, that socialist talk. Lol. On the flip side, I sent a woman I met at a BBQ recently who works in the film industry one of my links where the political side is an added bonus.

You'll have to let me know if you enjoyed eating the recipes! Smile

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Play me another broken record Joe. Maybe then I'll learn why we pay twice as much for healthcare as everybody else in the world. ~ Not Henry Kissinger

mhagle's picture

Read the OT quickly this morning and now not much of a comment. Definitely will try the first. Not familiar with all of the ingredients in the second, but it sounds yummy.

Thank you!

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Marilyn

"Make dirt, not war." eyo

Anja Geitz's picture

@mhagle

No worries. Glad you could stop by. PM me with any recipe questions if you'd like. Or we can just exchange emails if that's easier. Smile

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Play me another broken record Joe. Maybe then I'll learn why we pay twice as much for healthcare as everybody else in the world. ~ Not Henry Kissinger

Anja Geitz's picture

@mhagle

Farfalle in Italian means butterfly. Italians frequently name their pasta after their shape. Hence, in pasta lingo, the shape looks like a butterfly. Americans, being less lyrically minded in their language than Italians, call that pasta "Bow-Tie" because, I guess, it looks like a bow tie to them.

Langostino. Actually, langostino is both Spanish and Italian for “little lobster.” Although langostino’s taste and texture are similar to lobster meat, langostino is not the crustacean Americans typically refer to as “lobster” — American, or Maine, lobster and spiny lobster.

But for the recipe, you can substitute shrimp instead if you're not near a Trader Joe's where they sell Langostino cooked and frozen.

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Play me another broken record Joe. Maybe then I'll learn why we pay twice as much for healthcare as everybody else in the world. ~ Not Henry Kissinger

mhagle's picture

@Anja Geitz

I had never heard of langostinos - so thanks!

Farfalle is sold at our local Aldi store, which I understand is a sister store to Trader Joe's each started by brothers whose parents were grocers in Germany. Aldi is not as cool and artsy as Trader Joe's, but I am thankful we have a local one. Not many Trader Joe's stores in Texas yet. I'll have to look and see if Aldi sells langostinos!

Once again, another great OT that also inspires so many wonderful comments!

Thank you lovely Zoebear! I-m so happy

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Marilyn

"Make dirt, not war." eyo

Anja Geitz's picture

@mhagle

If you can't find langostinos, shrimp will work beautifully too.

Take pictures and post them! Yay! Dance 4

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Play me another broken record Joe. Maybe then I'll learn why we pay twice as much for healthcare as everybody else in the world. ~ Not Henry Kissinger

Unabashed Liberal's picture

back by to more carefully read this essay, but, from a glance, find it to be delightful. (BTW, big lover of Italian food, here--although, a lousy cook! Smile )

Very much agree with QMS and Bob--you have a super talent for weaving a narrative, and, for writing, period. Bob nailed it--your 'foodie' column/essay is professional grade.

Heck, I'd say that if you ever need another day job--you've got one, no problem! Good

Gotta run Kaity out, now, but, look forward to settling in for a good read, and, to passing the recipes on to my 'better half.'

Have a good one!

PleasantryMollie

I think dogs are the most amazing creatures; they give unconditional love. For me they are the role model for being alive.
~~Gilda Radner, Comedienne

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Everyone thinks they have the best dog, and none of them are wrong.

Anja Geitz's picture

@Unabashed Liberal

Its always interesting discovering new things about people here. So you play a musical instrument? How lovely! Which one? And what a great talent to have. So while we are cooking in the kitchen, you can serenade us! Smile

Thanks so much for the lovely complements. It does my heart good to hear you enjoy my scribblings and my recipes.

As always, Mollie, a joy talking to you.

Mangiare bene! (eat well)

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Play me another broken record Joe. Maybe then I'll learn why we pay twice as much for healthcare as everybody else in the world. ~ Not Henry Kissinger

janis b's picture

and Italian landscapes of food.

The enjoyment of food and cooking for me has continually grown over time. Naturally, the first years were experimental in ways that involved simply learning how to cook and were very hit-or-miss. In the beginning I especially enjoyed experimenting with Chinese food, later it was Vegetarian and Japanese. Now it’s anything that I’ve loved the taste of and try to replicate, or dishes made from reading recipes and taking bits from here and there to prepare something with the ingredients I have, or just winging it. It’s still hit-or-miss, but generally closer to satisfying. I think it’s actually the process of imagining ingredients together, and then the preparation involved that I enjoy the most, plus the pleasure of sharing delectable conversations around the table. It must be a treat to work at a market full of appetising ingredients.

Sometimes I find a recipe that I think is going to be perfect just the way it is, and in reality it is, like this one …

Baked Maple Lime Chicken Legs

INGREDIENTS
* 2 lbs whole chicken legs, bone in skin on
* 2 tablespoons lime zest
* Juice of 2 limes
* 4 cloves garlic, minced
* ¼ cup apple cider vinegar
* ½ cup maple syrup
* 1 cup olive oil
* 1 tablespoons fresh thyme leaves
* 1 tablespoons minced fresh ginger
* 1 teaspoons soy sauce
* 1 teaspoon salt
* 1 teaspoon freshly cracked black pepper

INSTRUCTIONS
1. In a medium bowl, whisk together lime zest, juice, garlic, apple cider vinegar, maple syrup, olive oil, thyme, ginger and soy sauce. Add chicken legs to a gallon sized ziplock bag, and pour marinade over it. Seal the bag and leave in refrigerator for at least 3 hours, or overnight.
2. Pre-heat oven to 400F (200C).
3. Transfer chicken legs to a baking pan and sprinkle them with salt and pepper.
4. Bake for 40-45 minutes or until a thermometer inserted reads 165 degrees Fahrenheit (74C) and juices run clear.
5. Serve hot.

- the only thing I sometimes change is adding other chicken parts.

Chef’s Table on netflix was the first cooking series I watched and loved. I enjoyed the individual chefs and their life stories as much as the food preparation. I also loved watching Feed Phil and Ugly Delicious. I haven’t watched the competitions because there are so many other fascinating cooking series and films.

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Anja Geitz's picture

@janis b

Will definitely be trying this one. Thank you Janis!

I think it’s actually the process of imagining ingredients together, and then the preparation involved that I enjoy the most

Oh, yes. You summed up the feeling so well. Case in point: I was so excited the other day imagining some flavor combination I came up with for a dessert that I blurted them out to a customer at work, who happened to be a chef at one of the hotels here in town. And guess what? She was as excited about the flavor combinations as I was! Lol.

Now I can't wait to get started making it, taking pictures of it, and writing about it!

Gosh, I wish those of us who like to cook could get together, have some wine, nibble on some chesse, and create one helluva meal together Smile

Salud!

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Play me another broken record Joe. Maybe then I'll learn why we pay twice as much for healthcare as everybody else in the world. ~ Not Henry Kissinger

janis b's picture

@Anja Geitz

cilantro and chili, as well as simplicity.

Something I love eating with those ingredients -

Mix lots of lime zest with crushed garlic, and something hot in a little olive oil. Coat shrimp/prawns in mixture. Put on skewers and press into chopped cilantro. Sear briefly and enjoy.

Gosh, I wish those of us who like to cook could get together, have some wine, nibble on some chesse, and create one helluva meal together

Bliss

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janis b's picture

@Anja Geitz

and therefore have no experience in preparing sweet delicacies. My best friend though, who is an amazing cook and dessert maker has perfected the art of sweet stuff. She even makes the most delicious desserts from coconut and cacao creamed avocado and freeze-dried berries. Does TJ's have freeze dried berries? They are intensely flavoured.

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Anja Geitz's picture

@janis b

Very intense flavor. Haven't really worked with them though.

A new product that I didn't particular care for is the Watermelon "Jerky". Not so much for the flavor per se, but the smell while I was chewing it reminded me of old cantaloupe rinds after they've been in tne trash for a few days. YMMV. But that was the experience for me. When customers ask me about the product, rather than lie to them, I just tell them I'm not a big fan of dried fruit, which is true as far as that goes.

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Play me another broken record Joe. Maybe then I'll learn why we pay twice as much for healthcare as everybody else in the world. ~ Not Henry Kissinger

janis b's picture

@Anja Geitz

I quite enjoyed the sharp, crunchy addition of the freeze-dried raspberries and blueberries.

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Anja Geitz's picture

@janis b

Or mix them with anything?

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Play me another broken record Joe. Maybe then I'll learn why we pay twice as much for healthcare as everybody else in the world. ~ Not Henry Kissinger

janis b's picture

@Anja Geitz @Anja Geitz

after baked or refrigerated

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Anja Geitz's picture

@janis b

I've always had a sweet tooth. One of the first things I learned to bake on my own were my mothers peanut butter cookies. Less milk, less sugar, more peanut butter, and you press them with the bottom of the glass after they came out of the oven, creating a denser chewier cookie. Marvelous.

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Play me another broken record Joe. Maybe then I'll learn why we pay twice as much for healthcare as everybody else in the world. ~ Not Henry Kissinger

janis b's picture

@Anja Geitz

I am a nut butter lover.

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Unabashed Liberal's picture

Chicken Vegetable Soup recipe--Mr M plans to give it a shot, but, with only the chicken stock, since I'm a vegetarian.

Lovely photo of your Mom, you, and your sister. I must say, your experience was the opposite of mine. Which is 'why' I'm a lousy cook; and, you're the equivalent of a chef, like your Dad.

Pleasantry

My Mother was an excellent cook. She also loved it. But, I never spent a nanosecond in the kitchen with her. Which was fine with her. Because, for years, before my feet hit the floor, I was up for at least an hour, before going to school, and, began, again, as soon as I got home--practicing, or playing my instruments. Later, Mother acknowledged that it was shortsighted to not have shown me more (about cooking). As a matter of fact, when my High School counselor pointed out that I had already met the requirements for graduation at the beginning of my senior year (and, I was free to take a bunch of electives), I took a Home Economics course--hoping to improve my lot in that area. It didn't do a whole lot of good, though.

Smile

Again, you really ought to consider doing a food column, professionally. (Of course, we'd still want you to still post here.)

Have a nice evening!

Mollie

I think dogs are the most amazing creatures; they give unconditional love. For me they are the role model for being alive.
~~Gilda Radner, Comedienne

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Everyone thinks they have the best dog, and none of them are wrong.