Monday OT: Sept 28 - International Day for Universal Access to Information

Sept 28 is day 272 of the Gregorian Calendar year,
Sweetmorn, Bureaucracy 52, 3186 YOLD (Discordian)
And let us not forget 13.0.7.15.18 mlc (the Mayan Long Count)

information

information - Public Domain

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International Day for Universal Access to Information
"Information wants to be free"  - Stewart Brand
The truth shall set you free - trad.
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On September 28, 1542, Juan Cabrillo arrived in what is now known as San Diego (California) and misnamed it San Miguel.  It's an easy mistake to make out here, where the map is simply littered with places named San This and Santa That, not to mention El Pueblo de Nuestra Señora la Reina de los Ángeles del Río Porciúncula..  So, I'll just hand this off to Wikipedia here ...

On September 28, he landed in what is now San Diego Bay and named it "San Miguel".[18] A little over a week later he reached Santa Catalina Island (October 7), which he named "San Salvador", after his flagship.[19] On sending a boat to the island "a great crowd of armed Indians appeared" — whom, however, they later "befriended". Nearby San Clemente Island was named "Victoria", in honor of the third ship of the fleet. The next morning, October 8, Cabrillo came to San Pedro Bay, which was named "Baya de los Fumos" (English: Smoke Bay). The following day they anchored overnight in Santa Monica Bay. Going up the coast Cabrillo saw Anacapa Island, which they learned from the Indians was uninhabited.

The fleet spent the next week in the islands, mostly anchored in Cuyler Harbor, a bay on the northeastern coast of San Miguel Island. On October 18 the expedition saw Point Conception, which they named "Cabo de Galera". Cabrillo's expedition recorded the names of numerous Chumash villages on the California coast and adjacent islands in October 1542 — then located in the two warring provinces of Xexo (ruled by an "old woman", now Santa Barbara County, California) and Xucu (now Ventura County, California).

On November 13 they sighted and named "Cabo de Piños" (possibly either Point Pinos or Point Reyes), but missed the entrance to San Francisco Bay, a lapse that mariners would repeat for the next two centuries and more, most likely because its entrance is frequently shrouded by fog. The expedition may have reached as far north as the Russian River or even the Columbia before autumn storms forced them to turn back. Because of the vagueness of his description, it is uncertain which northern river the expedition sighted. Coming back down the coast, Cabrillo entered Monterey Bay, naming it "Bahia de Los Piños".

On November 23, 1542, the little fleet arrived back in "San Salvador" (Santa Catalina Island) to overwinter and make repairs. There, around Christmas Eve, Cabrillo stepped out of his boat and splintered his shin when he stumbled onto a jagged rock while trying to rescue some of his men from attacking Tongva warriors. The injury became infected and developed gangrene, and he died on January 3, 1543 and was buried. A possible headstone was later found on San Miguel Island. His second-in-command brought the remainder of the party back to Navidad, where they arrived April 14, 1543.

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I'm sorry, but that is ludicrous From San Diego to Santa Catalina is about 86 miles and it took a bit over a week.  25 miles further to San Pedro, a day. 23 more miles to Santa Monica, another day. 25 days to go from Point Conception to maybe Point Reyes (Drakes Bay, heh, snort) 351 miles. Next they travel an unknown distance north, make a U-turn and get back to Santa Catalina in 10 days. So how much further did they go north, given that it took them 36 days to go roughly 500 miles from Santa Catalina to Point Reyes?

a) They went 90 miles further north to the Russian River, and made a 600 mile return journey, for a total distance of around 700 miles. In 10 days.

b) They went about 830 miles further north to the Columbia River and made a 1,330 mile return journey for a total distance of around 2,160 miles. In 10 days. In winter. Off the Northern California and Oregon coasts. In winter.  By sail.  With tons of rain, high winds and a dangerous and rocky uncharted lee shore everywhere along the route. In 1542. In 10 days. In winter.

HOW THE HOLY HELL IS THIS REMOTELY CONFUSING TO ANYBODY?

Excuse me, sorry.

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On this day in history:

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1066 – William the Bastard landed in England
1238 – King James I of Aragon conquered Valencia from the Moors.
1542 – Juan Rodríguez Cabrillo of Portugal arrived at what is now San Diego, California.
1779 – Samuel Huntington was elected President of the Continental Congress
1781 – Colonial forces backed by a French fleet began the siege of Yorktown  (It's tricky besieging a chunk of the coast without a fleet)
1787 – The Congress of the Confederation voted to send the newly-written United States Constitution to the state legislatures for approval.
1821 – The Declaration of Independence of the Mexican Empire was drafted
1871 – The Brazilian Parliament passed a law that freed all children thereafter born to slaves, and all government-owned slaves.
1889 – The General Conference on Weights and Measures (CGPM) defined the length of a meter. (It was a meter, that was easy peasy)
1919 – Race riots began in Omaha, Nebraska.
1924 – The first aerial circumnavigation was completed by a team from the US Army.
1928 – Alexander Fleming noticed a bacteria-killing mold growing in his laboratory, discovering what later became known as penicillin.
1941 – Ted Williams had a .406 batting average for the season, and becomes the last major league baseball player to bat .400 or better.
1961 – A military coup in Damascus effectively ended the United Arab Republic
1970 – Egyptian President Gamal Abdel Nasser died of a heart attack in Cairo.
1971 – The Parliament of the UK passed the Misuse of Drugs Act 1971, banning the medicinal use of cannabis.
1973 – The ITT Building in New York City was bombed in protest over ITT's involvement in the coup d'état in Chile.
1995 – Yitzhak Rabin and  Yasser Arafat signed the Interim Agreement on the West Bank and the Gaza Strip.
2008 – Falcon 1 became the first privately developed liquid-fuel ground-launched vehicle to put a payload into orbit.
2009 – The military junta leading Guinea attacked a protest rally, killing or wounding 1400 people.

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Born this day in:

Confucius Say...

Wheresoever you go, go with all your heart.

Everything has its beauty, but not everyone sees it.

He who conquers himself is the mightiest warrior.

Study the past if you would define the future.

551 BC – Confucius, teacher, editor, politician, and philosopher
1573 – Théodore de Mayerne, physician
1605 – Ismaël Bullialdus, astronomer and mathematician
1746 – William Jones, philologist and scholar
1803 – Prosper Mérimée, Farchaeologist, historian, and author
1809 – Alvan Wentworth Chapman, physician and botanist
1836 – Thomas Crapper, plumber, invented the ballcock 
1852 – Henri Moissan, chemist and academic
1852 – Isis Pogson, astronomer and meteorologist
1856 – Kate Douglas Wiggin, author and educator
1860 – Paul Ulrich Villard, chemist and physicist
1868 – Evelyn Beatrice Hall, writer best known for her biography of Voltaire,
1890 – Florence Violet McKenzie, electrical engineer
1892 – Elmer Rice, playwright
1893 – Hilda Geiringer, mathematician
1900 – Isabel Pell, socialite Resistance fighter
1907 – Bhagat Singh, activist
1923 – Tuli Kupferberg, singer, poet, and writer
1924 – Marcello Mastroianni, actor and singer
1925 – Seymour Cray, computer scientist
1925 – Martin David Kruskal, physicist and mathematician
1928 – Koko Taylor, singer
1930 – Tommy Collins, country music singer and songwriter
1932 – Víctor Jara, singer, songwriter, poet, and director
1933 – Johnny Mathis, singer and songwriter
1936 – Emmett Chapman, guitarist, invented the Chapman Stick
1937 – Glenn Sutton, country music songwriter and record producer
1938 – Ben E. King, singer, songwriter .and producer
1942 – Edward "Little Buster" Forehand, singer, songwriter, and guitarist
1947 – Rhonda Hughes, mathematician and academic
1950 – Paul Burgess, drummer
1951 – Jim Diamond, singer, songwriter, and musician
1952 – Andy Ward, drummer
1954 – George Lynch, guitarist and songwriter
1955 – Kenny Kirkland, pianist
1960 – Jennifer Rush, singer and songwriter
1967 – Moon Zappa, singer, actress, zappa, and author
1968 – Trish Keenan, singer, songwriter, and guitarist
1968 – Sean Levert, R&B singer, songwriter, and actor
1969 – Éric Lapointe, singer, songwriter, and keyboard player
1971 – Joseph Arthur, singer, songwriter, and guitarist

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Died this day in:

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               

- Harpo Marx -

                                                 

“While there is a lower class I am of it, while there is a criminal class I am of it, while there is a soul in prison I am not free.”

- John Dos Passos -
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1891 – Herman Melville, author and poet
1895 – Louis Pasteur, chemist and microbiologist
1899 – Giovanni Segantini, painter
1938 – Charles Duryea, engineer and businessman
1953 – Edwin Hubble, astronomer and scholar
1964 – Harpo Marx, comedian, actor, and singer
1966 – André Breton, author and poet
1970 – John Dos Passos, novelist, poet, essayist, and playwright
1991 – Miles Davis, trumpet player, composer, and bandleader
1993 – Peter De Vries, editor and novelist
2013 – George Amon Webster, singer and pianist
2019 – José José, singer, guitarist, and bassist

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Holidays, Holy Days, Festivals, Feast Days, Days of Recognition, and such:
Freedom from Hunger Day
International Day for Universal Access to Information
World Rabies Day

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Music goes here, iirc, well, With apologies Wink

Tuli Kupferberg

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Koko Taylor

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Víctor Jara

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Johnny Mathis

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Emmett Chapman

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Ben E. King

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Miles Davis

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Jose Jose

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Image is public domain

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It's an open thread, so do your thing

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Comments

Lookout's picture

The early European explorers are difficult to trace. After all it was roughly 500 years ago. They've been arguing about DeSoto's trip through Alabama for quite awhile. They definitely found a sword from his expedition in Rome, GA beside the Coosa River. The large town of Coosa is thought to be under a lake built in the 60's near Centre, AL. He left a slave infected with small pox when he moved on....soon decimating the local population. He used a Venice made glass bead for trade that is used like cookie crumbs to trace his route, and there are many gaps and disputes about it.

The other Spanish explorer who came though our area was Tristan de Luna.
http://www.ourgeorgiahistory.com/ogh/Tristan_de_Luna
He came through 20 or so years afer DeSoto and described the decimation of the population.

Well thanks for the OT, history lesson, and music el. Hope everyone has a good day!

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“Until justice rolls down like water and righteousness like a mighty stream.”

enhydra lutris's picture

@Lookout are somewhat confused and confusing because everybody and their brother wanted his route to pass through their township or whatever for local pride and tourism. Beyond that, there was the "official" study done when archaeology was much cruder and less scientific today including the fact that they didn't try to ferret ut and reconcile to the oral histories of the indigenous peoples. Of course, that became "fact" or at least quasi-fact and then was hard to "disprove", as if that really needed to be done anyway. And, of course, he wandered a lot. They do continue to get a better handle on it, however.

De Luna, as you no doubt know had a lot of supplies and such destroyed by a storm that hit the Florida coast - who could imagine such a thing, eh?

Thanks for reading
be well and have a good one

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That, in its essence, is fascism--ownership of government by an individual, by a group, or by any other controlling private power. -- Franklin D. Roosevelt --

magiamma's picture

et al

Hot here again and it looks to be the new normal.

Boy howdy, the blob is back. The last one lasted about four years. And we seriously have not really recovered. (Only the abstract is viewable.)

High-impact marine heatwaves attributable to human-induced global warming

https://science.sciencemag.org/content/369/6511/1621.full

Marine heatwaves, defined as periods of anonymously high regional surface ocean temperatures, have also become common in recent decades. Laufkötter et al. show that the frequency of these events has already increased more than 10-fold because of anthropogenic global warming, making marine heatwaves, which typically occurred once in hundreds to thousands of years in preindustrial times, likely to occur on an annual to decadal basis if the global average air temperature rises by 3°C.

Take good care!

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Stop Climate Change Silence - Start the Conversation

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enhydra lutris's picture

@magiamma
hotter today and most of the week predicted. Already hot today. As you note, the new normal. Not good to hear that the blob is back at all.

be well and have a good one.

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That, in its essence, is fascism--ownership of government by an individual, by a group, or by any other controlling private power. -- Franklin D. Roosevelt --

@enhydra lutris
Not right now, but soon. Wind patterns, instead of being East-west are mostly North-South.
We alternate between hot air from Texas and cold air from the north pole. Probable that polar ice melting is causing the disturbance.

According to the dioramas in the Field museum, once upon a time, Chicago was a tropical Savanna with the Alaska lion and jaguars hunting hippos on the shore of Lake Michigan. Then millions of years later, it was buried under 5,000 feet of ice (Yes, a mile of ice). Had one of the hottest summers on record here this year, mostly 90's with no rain. Lookout, most of the time it was hotter than Anniston! IIRC, Anniston was cooler than normal because of unusually high rainfall. Two years ago we had a record cool Winter that nearly destroyed my peach trees, minus 20 degrees with minus 40 wind chill. The old branches all died, but in Spring there was new growth at the very top of the trees. Can't reach up and grab a peach any more.

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We are so screwed.

enhydra lutris's picture

@The Voice In the Wilderness
peaches in Chicago. Guess I think of it as always cold and windy, Hope they make it through this season

be well and have a good one

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That, in its essence, is fascism--ownership of government by an individual, by a group, or by any other controlling private power. -- Franklin D. Roosevelt --

@enhydra lutris
The Georgia peaches are too tender, although they grow in Alabama and are tastier than Michigan peaches. But a tree-ripe Michigan peach is worlds better than a Georgia peach picked green for commercial shipping. Peaches don't really ripen on the counter. they just soften. the sugars and flavenoids don't develop any further. Michigan winters are not as harsh as Wisconsin where peaches will not survive. The prevailing winds are West to East, so the wind warms as it crosses Lake Michigan. it also picks up moisture. western Michigan has heavy snows. Peaches grow in Illinois near Lake Michigan and in southern Illinois near Missouri there are commercial operations. That is recent. No global warming, huh? I heard maybe ten years ago on PBS that insects and amphibians from Southern Illinois are moving into Northern Illinois and that Southern trees are doing better on parkway planting than the Northern varieties formerly recommended. Guess the bugs and insects and trees were taken in by the climate hoax, huh?

To me nature changing is more convincing than all the research station temperature readings that are subject to instrument and human error. Toads don't watch CNN!

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We are so screwed.

enhydra lutris's picture

@The Voice In the Wilderness

Georgia peach as local produce and anyplace that gets snow as not plantable. Peaches in the summertime and apples in the fall, the song says, so it has to be from someplace where they both grow.

be well and have a good one

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That, in its essence, is fascism--ownership of government by an individual, by a group, or by any other controlling private power. -- Franklin D. Roosevelt --

@enhydra lutris

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We are so screwed.

My TDS neighbor spent last night helping her stepmother evacuate for the third time (2017, 2019, 2020); house and barn lost in 2017 but she got her horses and dogs out.

We hope we're fine, but the mandatory evacuation zones are getting uncomfortably close.

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magiamma's picture

@Marie
and which fire? Take care. We still smell smoke here but not much now. So worrisome.

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Stop Climate Change Silence - Start the Conversation

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@magiamma

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enhydra lutris's picture

@magiamma
since maybe 7 or 8 am today.

be well and have a good one

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That, in its essence, is fascism--ownership of government by an individual, by a group, or by any other controlling private power. -- Franklin D. Roosevelt --

enhydra lutris's picture

@Marie
who lives in Oakmont. She's out of town, so can't even try to salvage any valuables during evacuation. Hope you stay safe.

be well and have a good one.

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That, in its essence, is fascism--ownership of government by an individual, by a group, or by any other controlling private power. -- Franklin D. Roosevelt --

Granma's picture

that helped with the fires, our temperatures are to be in the 80s with sunshine this week. I am happy about that, love that kind of weather. And I'm not ready to have the gray skies and drizzle for months.

I hope they are getting the fires in California under control and that none of you are coping with smoky air.

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enhydra lutris's picture

@Granma

air here cleared for a couple of days, but we now have several nearby fires. One in Castro Valley, quickly shut down, I think, one in Napa and one in Sonoma plus something. Last map I looked at had 3 names, Glass Fire, Shady Fire and another, all right in same general area. I think that the Glass fire (Napa) jumped the Mayacamas ridge via hotspots to create the Shady Fire and dunno about the third.

be well and have a good one.

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That, in its essence, is fascism--ownership of government by an individual, by a group, or by any other controlling private power. -- Franklin D. Roosevelt --

enhydra lutris's picture

White Crowned Sparrow (probably pugetensis)

be well and have a good one

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That, in its essence, is fascism--ownership of government by an individual, by a group, or by any other controlling private power. -- Franklin D. Roosevelt --

Granma's picture

@enhydra lutris geese a few nights ago. I didn't previously know they migrate at night because that is when air currents are favorable for them.

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It's Yom Kippur.

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enhydra lutris's picture

@crescentmoon
reminder and video.

be well and have a good one.

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That, in its essence, is fascism--ownership of government by an individual, by a group, or by any other controlling private power. -- Franklin D. Roosevelt --

enhydra lutris's picture

because I have no audio at this exact moment.

be well and have a good one

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That, in its essence, is fascism--ownership of government by an individual, by a group, or by any other controlling private power. -- Franklin D. Roosevelt --

@enhydra lutris . Sounds like the Fugs have a timeless song with that one.

Pick a name any name and read about him...Victor Jara. Filling in egregious gaps in my education. One should know, at the very least, how one's taxes are spent.

Good for the White Crowned Sparrow. Long may she fly.

I see you all in CA have more heat and wind along with some fires. Hope you catch a break asap.

Thanks for the OT, take care.

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enhydra lutris's picture

@randtntx

over the office right now and couldn't say why it won't play right now, so I just hoped it would and put it us there.

Jara was a very special person, that's why Peron's goons reserved special punishment for him.

be well and have a good one.

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That, in its essence, is fascism--ownership of government by an individual, by a group, or by any other controlling private power. -- Franklin D. Roosevelt --

Unabashed Liberal's picture

about José José's passing.

2019 – José José, singer, guitarist, and bassist

He was a national 'heartthrob' when I was a young student at UDLAP (and, for years to come!).

José José, Iconic Mexican Crooner, Dies at 71
2:29 PM PDT 9/28/2019 by John Hecht

The beloved 'Prince of Song' was known for such popular ballads as "He Renunciado a Ti" and "El Triste."

Be careful out there, and take good care of yourself.

(of course, good luck to Everyone in path of wildfires!)

Mollie

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Everyone thinks they have the best dog, and none of them are wrong.

enhydra lutris's picture

audience was hip to Jose' Jose'.

DSo far, the current fires of concern are about a mile north and would have to jump the delta to get here, not feasible.

be well and have a good one.

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That, in its essence, is fascism--ownership of government by an individual, by a group, or by any other controlling private power. -- Franklin D. Roosevelt --

Maybe a real sailor like QMS could solve the Cabrillo puzzle you posed. A part of the answer might be the California current. I believe it makes for faster sailing south, but I've no idea whether it would be enough to explain things. Another little point: I don't think the Columbia was "discovered" by Europeans or Russians until much later. Much later. Most of the River mouths in Oregon require some serious sailing and navigating skills to even attempt entering. There is a reason most boats are guided in even today by Bar pilots. I seem to recall that based on the color of the water, it was assumed that a large river was there, but it was not approachable by sail.

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enhydra lutris's picture

@peachcreek
wiki's author or editor. To make that run in a modern sailboat, with all of today's charts and navigational aids, knowing where one is going (or trying to go), in decent weather would be an accomplishment. Santa Catalina to Columbia River or the other way in 10 days is pretty good traveling. Throw in the extra leg from Point Reyes to the Columbia and it is very, very iffy.

Given that they had no idea where they were going no charts and probably typical winter weather, and were not in a modern boat it is vastly improbable and maybe impossible that they could've done it, which, to me, means that they only went to Russian River and vagueness in the description of the river mouth is irrelevant.

(I must admit that I was waiting for a reaction from QMS, but I'm certain that it would be damn near a miracle for them to have made the longer trip.)

be well and have a good one

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That, in its essence, is fascism--ownership of government by an individual, by a group, or by any other controlling private power. -- Franklin D. Roosevelt --