late night vignette

Hate my designer shoes

read these death threats along with me

breathe deeply of carbon dioxide

last chance, bus

for Vegas

Chance Wayne

Tennessee knew

fabric woven poorly comes undone

raveling in fire of the nearest cigarette

bound to implode

upon subscription.

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Comments

For example, was Chance Wayne one of the characters you portrayed?

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smiley7's picture

@HenryAWallace
Close to.

Lots of Tennessee, but not Chance; Newman was Wayne.

"Brick"

"Waiting for the click," Still waiting, Henry, shrewd of you to know.

Mendacity printed upon the brain in silence.

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@smiley7

That I got when I googled. But. there is always the theeyater.

Glad to know you did lots of Williams. Good for an actor.

I had to google 'cause I ain't shrewd. I'm sometimes nude. Sometimes stewed (in the sense of angry, not in the sense of drunk or simmered in a pot). I do make a yummy stew, though (in the sense of being the cook, not in the sense of being a tasty entree). I need a haircut, so I will soon be hewed. I've been wooed. Even two'd. I'm seldom lewd. Well, not in public or on message boards, anyway. So, I'll say nothing about "screwed."

And so on. (-;

But, no, I ain't shrewd, smiley7. Would that I were. You are a poet. I'm merely a rhymer.

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smiley7's picture

@HenryAWallace
The original production by Cheryl Crawford opened on March 10, 1959 at the Martin Beck Theatre in New York City. Directed by Elia Kazan, it starred Paul Newman, Geraldine Page, Sidney Blackmer, Madeleine Sherwood, Diana Hyland, Logan Ramsey, and Rip Torn. Bruce Dern also played a small role. The production was nominated for three Tony Awards, including Best Actress for Page.

Tennessee and Josh Logan came to see an adaptation of hamlet we did on eighth avenue. Mainly they were there at the star's request. i played the ghost in a rain jacket. I did have one on each arm and helped them down the stairs to our theatre.

New Orleans gave me a better understanding of Williams, i think, as i too was an angry young man.
Thanks for letting me share,

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@smiley7

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Lookout's picture

FFA regulates the manufacture of highly flammable clothing. Standards have been established for the clothing textiles, vinyl plastic film, carpets and rugs, children's sleepwear and mattresses and mattress pads.

The Flammable Fabrics Act was passed in 1953 to regulate the manufacture of highly flammable clothing, such as brushed rayon sweaters and children's cowboy chaps. The Flammable Fabrics Act of 1953 originally placed enforcement authority with the Federal Trade Commission. In 1967, Congress amended the Flammable Fabrics Act to expand its coverage to include interior furnishings as well as paper, plastic, foam and other materials used in wearing apparel and interior furnishings. Standards have been established for the flammability of clothing textiles, vinyl plastic film (used in clothing), carpets and rugs, children's sleepwear and mattresses and mattress pads.

https://www.cpsc.gov/Regulations-Laws--Standards/Statutes/Flammable-Fabr...

Well, on second thought maybe it doesn't apply to the social fabric...or perhaps that is another regulation we now ignore?

No matter, enjoyed your poetic ponderings. Lovely morning here. Great stroll through trade day. Off to finish up my current round of mowing. Have a good one!

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“Until justice rolls down like water and righteousness like a mighty stream.”

smiley7's picture

@Lookout
Thanks for reading, Lookout, appreciate it.

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janis b's picture

Thanks smiley, for the prompt to inquire into the background of your wonderful poem.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sweet_Bird_of_Youth

I think I’d like to read that play and will look for the edition that has the cover shown in wiki.

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