Welcome to Saturday's Potluck

“Learn the rules like a pro, so you can break them like an artist.”
Pablo Picasso

The Covid disruption has changed some regular habits. For several years I have provided transportation for others to perform their grocery shopping. 17 months ago started to do weekly shopping instead with a list and learned the food stamps rules. It is quite different from the past when my Great Grandmother went to the local commodity store once a month.

Began to travel through the aisles, viewing product selections and prices totally absent from my normal shopping patterns. Soups are no longer a budget food. Wide variety of soup stocks and bases available to "make your own soup". Whole chickens were on sale this week and less than the quart of soup stock.

The chicken could be cut up for multiple meals and still make a couple of quarts of stock. It just takes a little time, knowledge and skill. Added benefit less packaging to throw in the garbage and less profit to a mega food corporation.

Christina Pirello makes a quick basic soup base in just a few minutes.

Christina's website has multiple soup recipes. While I enjoy vegetarian meals, not a purist. Often use her recipes as a starting point and do not use vegan substitutes. Also, we each have our own path to staying well and I don't use her advice as general health information.

________

Tips on chicken stock.

________

What is on your mind today?

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enhydra lutris's picture

chicken price, though, of course, chemical free whole chicken runs higher than regular and maybe higheer than stock too here. Often make soups, so will try to check out those vids ad some point, but not today - just a quick e-mail and c99 check during morning coffee before finishing loading up and heading off to Yosemite. Just heard spouse stirring, so I can go check on location of some stuff I just remembered that I don't have packed/loaded yet. Recent, current heat wave here, allegedly shorts weather up there too.

be well and have a good one

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That, in its essence, is fascism--ownership of government by an individual, by a group, or by any other controlling private power. -- Franklin D. Roosevelt --

@enhydra lutris I am happy for ya, and envious, as well. My next "adventure" is a drive to Padre Island for a few days. It is beautiful there, and a fairly short drive.
Pack your camera!

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studentofearth's picture

@enhydra lutris Yosemite is on my would like to visit list.

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Still yourself, deep water can absorb many disturbances with minimal reaction.
--When the opening appears release yourself.

Any truly cheap food is usually bought up by people on food stamps, thus, sold out constantly. Not that I eat Ramen Noodles, but it breaks my heart that people in my town have to feed their children that junk. Where the shelves are empty is where the poor and hungry have shopped.
I intend to watch the videos today. If I am in a real rush, I cheat, and use Better Than Bouillon.
I eat meat, but it doesn't take much of it to flavor soup. I can make a cut of meat go a very long way.
I am going to buy my brother groceries today. It will be interesting to see how much that adds to the price of my list.
Thanks so much for the OT.

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studentofearth's picture

@on the cusp increases as heat and serve type foods. Shortages disappeared, then reappeared for some products. One of the patterns seen a few times is several months after shortages of something like yeast, the product shows up with deep discounts at stores selling overstocks and products with close pull dates.

Pepsi Co products including Frito-Lay snacks base price has increased and the discount grocery stores are similar price to a general grocery store. There seems to be a fair amount of manipulation happening, not simply supply disruptions.

Instant Ramen noodles were a treat I could not afford regularly until after college. After a while quite using the flavor packet and began rinsing the cooked noodles to remove most of the oil. Impatient waiting for a large pot of water to boil for Italian pastas. Still eat occasionally with pesto and parmesan cheese, tossed in a fry pan with meat dripping to pull in the flavor, or placed in a bowl with homemade broth topped with vegetables. The powder in the packet or disposable Cup certainly has the potential to contribute to health issues.

There are better choices for cheap food, but many are not aware of them. Most outreach education programs are funded by the food corporations. Sometimes the limitations are lack of cooking equipment and space to cook.

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Still yourself, deep water can absorb many disturbances with minimal reaction.
--When the opening appears release yourself.

@studentofearth have all increased. Milk, butter, eggs are all pricey.
Example: 1 lb. ground chuck in 2019 was $2.35 at regular price. The lb. I bought this evening was $6.00 on sale. Fresh corn on the cob: Regularly 3 for a buck, and when on sale, 4 for a buck. Today, on sale: 2 for a buck.
I can't say much about heat and serve, since I buy so very little of that. My brother's oven is out, so I bought him some frozen dinners to put in the microwave. He has health problems, needs meals in a box. Quick and easy, since putting together from scratch food is tough for him.

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studentofearth's picture

@on the cusp This area has become fashionable to visit and relocate from other parts of the country. There is a high saturation of national chains relative to our base population. For example, a Trader Joe's built next to a Food for All, Krogers low price grocery chain a few years ago. When tourism got hit with Covid lockdowns Trader's reduced their produce and non private label prices to match the discount store. January another national grocery chain has entered the market and priced decreased at the Food for All. The regional restaurant supply store had better pricing than Costco for years. It was recently bought by a national company. None of the old employees appear to be still there and several products are priced nearer to a regular grocery store. The general trend is probably inflation and when competition stabilizes we will see significant price increases locally.

Not easy providing food to someone who is unable to do more than reheat. The frozen meal option is one I used to supply meals for a Grandmother. My mother was more subtle. She was always "accidentally" cooking too much food for Sunday dinner and offered the leftovers to Grandma. "Oh there is not enough for the two of us, would you like to take it home."

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Still yourself, deep water can absorb many disturbances with minimal reaction.
--When the opening appears release yourself.

Granma's picture

I especially appreciate your comment that we each have our own path to wellness. It is truth in my mind. Part of the reason is that genes play a role in our health, possibly a much bigger role than many people realize. But I have known people who were healthy and energetic up into their 90s, and yet ate poorly, few vegetables or fruits. At the same time, knowing others who gardened, ate lots of fruits and veggies, many organic, but were hit with health issues of various kinds in early 40s. I think most of us do the best we can, and get what we get.

Food economy is a funny thing. An inexpensive food, over time, can become almost a luxury item as it's cost goes up. My impression is that people, maybe country people especially, used to eat a wide variety of protein foods, a wider variety than is now available to most of us. It is interesting to read about the meals and foods people have enjoyed in the past. Descriptions of some things makes me kind of shiver because it sounds gross to me. Other food descriptions sound delicious, something I would love to try.

Maybe people who have travelled in other parts of the world have noticed not just different ways of preparing foods, but foods eaten that we don't see in the US.

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@Granma I have eaten or seen eaten foods around the world that are not in our US diet.
I agree that we all have different dietary needs, and what works for me may not work for thee.

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studentofearth's picture

@Granma around the United States visiting restaurants with regional cuisine specializing in local ingredients or ethnic dishes of immigrant population. Best dark rye bread and smoked salmon lunch plate was in Astoria, Oregon at an old local diner catering to Norwegian settler families.

A bit of International travel reinforced my opinion someone does not need to be a world traveler to experience a variety of dishes from around the world or in various time periods. Simply locating and walking around ethnic markets can widen our exposure to a culture and food choices.

Most dishes I have enjoyed. A few, one bite was enough for a lifetime.

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Still yourself, deep water can absorb many disturbances with minimal reaction.
--When the opening appears release yourself.

mimi's picture

Junkyard grows at Kahului Harbor homeless encampment.

May be one of those rich folks, who don't have to work for a living, could help solve the problem?

Live The Billionaire Lifestyle On Maui With Exotic Estates

No aloha no more.

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mimi

@mimi plan a trip there, and wanted to take her to lunch.
She discouraged me, saying stay a day on the Big Island, then get to the others, since homelessness had increased, causing crime to rise, and literally causing human waste on the sidewalks.
She may wind up coming back home to the mainland.

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mimi's picture

@on the cusp @on the cusp
but it all has changed a lot in the last six to ten years or so. Many of the residents on Maui return home to their mainland families or houses. I never spent more than a couple of hours in Honolulu and crime - being this bad or that good - I would not want to stay there. It is not my thing, so to speak. It is a big city with highways that get on your nerves, if you want to go from one place to another, and I am not looking for glitzy shopping opportunities there or marvel over homeless camps. For sure you can always find great restaurants and resorts to pamper your taste buds.

If you want to enjoy nature, I would suggest you go to Big Island and Maui. Take a tour to Hana on Maui and enjoy what is left of the beautiful nature it was when I was there the last time, which is now also over ten years ago. On big Island you need to take a guided tour. The volcano's activities are - I would say - dangerous, but breathtaking. It is unique. I know Hilo a bit and to me it seemed to have been the most authentic Hawaiian city.

My son who lives on Maui over 15 years by now (and he is not one of the rich folks, but a worker on minimum wage, working his ass and back off to the point I believe he has already started to ruin his health), just cries tears for what it has been and what it is now. But may be it is coming back to what the islands should be, let's hope. I mean 'Corona will fix it', right? I hope you hear my snark in what I say.

In any case, enjoy a trip to HI. It is a special place. Smile

PS: You better read this article, before you make a trip to Big Island.
Earthquake Rattles World’s Largest Volcano
Pele,Lighting up ancient Hawaiian legends, Pele (pronounced peh-leh) the goddess of fire, lightning, wind, dance and volcanoes is a well-known character. And she seems to be pretty mad these days with the world. So be careful.

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mimi

@mimi Harbor memorial, but that is it. My companion has dreamed of going there, so the trip would be for him.
A teacher pal taught summer school there for 3 months. She hated it.
A lawyer pal went there for a couple of weeks. She hated it.
A friend just returned from a 6 weeks job there. He hated it.
One friend took his family for a week, was bored.
Another friend took his family to a resort there, thoroughly enjoyed the fancy resort, did no exploring at all, had a blast.
My preference would be Easter Island. Gorgeous beaches, lots of historical sights, no homeless, and zero crime.

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studentofearth's picture

investments. The homes can be used to generate income, decrease tax liabilities, as collateral to borrow money, a hedge against inflation and multi-generational wealth building. Do not see any wealthy savior stepping forward to solve the problem.

The article does focus on some of the complex issues involved. The abandoned vehicles providing shelter and attracting homeless is not a problem locally. A large portion of the homeless locally are likely to have a vehicle and abandon it when it is no longer fixable.

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Still yourself, deep water can absorb many disturbances with minimal reaction.
--When the opening appears release yourself.

earthling1's picture

Just cleaned out Grandma's basement and had to trash over 50 #10 tins of various foodstuffs, all from the 50s-70s.
Opened some of them, but were clearly over the 25 year storage limit.
I'm sure she didn't pay that much for them, by todays dollars. Probably cost a chunk of change back then.
There's a lesson here somewhere.
Some of it did make it to the compost pile though.
Thanks for the OT, SOE.

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After six years, still getting robo-calls from Marriot Hotels.
They're like herpes.

studentofearth's picture

@earthling1 Buy and store products regularly use. Keep rotating inventory. Don't buy a large volume of products never tasted just because the price was right. Just a couple of lessons I have learned over the years. But still have too much stuff which only seems valuable to me for peace of mind or future projects.

Times and needs change. In the 50's and 70's she may have been feeding enough people a #10 can was the right size to keep in storage.

Not the easiest task to close down someones life.

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4 users have voted.

Still yourself, deep water can absorb many disturbances with minimal reaction.
--When the opening appears release yourself.