Where are the millions of missing workers? This could be where

Probably the biggest mystery today regarding the economy is "what happened to all the workers?"
The first theory was that they were all living large on UI benefits, so all that was necessary was to cut off those benefits and "problem solved".

The reluctance of so many people to reenter the labor force is a bit of a mystery, especially after some 9 million people lost unemployment benefits in September. Economists had expected to see a pickup in labor-force participation by now.

“The most disappointing thing about [the jobs report] is that it does not really show much in terms of a return to the labor force following the expiration of the enhanced unemployment benefits in September,” said senior money market economist Thomas Simons of Jefferies LLC.
Now many are questioning the assumption that the expiry of some unemployment benefits would prompt workers to return.

Except cutting UI didn't drive the workers back. Now those same people who wanted UI cut are saying something about "savings from UI", but that makes zero sense since most of the people we are talking about couldn't save any money when they had a job.

Another explanation: Massive government spending, including stimulus checks and generous unemployment benefits, have allowed more people to bide their time before returning to work. They can hold out for better job offers, the thinking goes.

Still, many economists are convinced the size of the labor force will swell in the coming months if the pandemic burns itself out and wages continue to rise. Many people, they say, will need the income
“The money won’t last forever and the U.S. is a difficult place to be voluntarily unemployed,” said chief economist Ian Shepherdson of Pantheon Macroeconomics.

There are other theories about people seeking non-monetary rewards, and while that's a nice idea, we know that is hogwash.

How can hundreds of thousands of Americans simply vanish from society, and no one notice?

Well, I've come up with a theory. It's based on a known fact in American society today.
You see, hundreds of thousands of Americans vanish from society every year. Year after year.
We all know it, but we don't like to talk about it. We don't even like to think about it.

I'm talking about the homeless.

Remember when there were stories about an eviction tsunami?

For the one in every seven tenants in the U.S. currently behind on rent, however, the end of COVID could mean eviction. Marginalized tenants are especially at risk — one in five Black tenants, Latino tenants and tenants with children currently owe back rent.

“We have projections of 500,000 people living on the streets of L.A. if nothing is done to curb these evictions,” Trinidad Ruiz of the L.A. Tenants Union says — a catastrophic increase from the estimated 40,000 people currently without housing in the Los Angeles area. Without assistance, over 10 million people nationwide could find themselves without housing when the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) eviction moratorium ends on June 30.

First off I want to draw your attention to the math.
The top article says that 9 million workers are missing.
Now we find out that 10 million people nationwide were at risk of becoming homeless.
Those two numbers are suspiciously close.

That's not to say there is a one-to-one relationship between evicted/homeless/missing workers. What I'm saying that there is reason to believe that there is significant overlap.

Secondly, consider where the homeless generally come from.

the vast majority of people receiving homeless services in L.A. have held down jobs, some right up until the time they became homeless....
They found that nearly half (47%) of working age adults enrolling in homeless services in L.A. had worked in the four years prior to becoming homeless. And about one in five were working in the same quarter they showed up in LAHSA's system.
Nearly three-quarters (74%) had some record of employment between 1995 and 2018.

Now consider just how difficult it is to hold down a decent job while homeless. Not to mention how hard it is to get a new job while homeless.

You may point out that the eviction tsunami never happened.
Well, actually it did. The Eviction Tsunami is both ongoing, and dramatically under-reported, because "Fuck The Poor, Amirite?"

It is not the sudden surge of evictions that tenants and advocates feared after the Supreme Court ruled in August that President Biden’s extension of the eviction moratorium was unconstitutional. Instead, what’s emerging is a more gradual eviction crisis that is increasingly hitting communities across the country, especially those where the distribution of federal rental assistance has been slow, and where tenants have few protections.
...
In Indianapolis in late October, Pamela Brewer waited nervously for a hearing on her pending eviction in a courthouse packed with hundreds of other tenants. There, landlords have been piling new evictions onto a backlog of thousands of older ones from the pandemic that are just now being executed.

“The hallways were full, the outside was full coming up the steps, the foyer was full,” said Ms. Brewer, who is months behind on rent after losing her job on the assembly line at a home appliances manufacturer at the start of the pandemic. “You look around and everybody’s knees are shaking like, What’s going to happen?”

Those poor people should be afraid, because eviction courts aren’t about due process and getting a fair hearing. Eviction courts were created to help landlords make sure that those evictions are handled very quickly.
Much like the number of homeless, no one really wants to know the truth behind the tidal wave of evictions. Perhaps even more important, the people with money and power, the ones who own the media, don't care. At all.
That's why we aren't even close to knowing the scale of the problem.

The true extent of the crisis facing tenants is understated by the available numbers on eviction, housing advocates and experts say. “The eviction avalanche is absolutely here across the country,” said Katie Goldstein, a housing justice campaign director with the Center for Popular Democracy.

There is no national database of evictions, and the haphazard patchwork of local policies and record-keeping methods in courts across the country poses severe obstacles to creating one. One-third of all U.S. counties have no available court eviction data at all, according to New America, a left-leaning think tank.

And most tenants are forced to leave their rental units not because of formal eviction proceedings, but because they’ve been illegally locked out or their utilities have been shut off, or because they want to avoid an eviction being added to their record by leaving on their own.

A 2015 study from Milwaukee found that there were two of these so-called informal evictions for every one formal eviction. A recent survey of low-income tenants in Washington State found that one in five tenants were subjected to a method of informal eviction during the pandemic, compared with one in eight before the pandemic.

Finally we arrive at the terrible conclusion.
1. Those people who said that they were in danger of being evicted were telling the truth.
2. It happened, and now they've been unable to maintain a steady job while losing their homes.
3. Homeless people are invisible.

The simply fact is that we have absolutely no idea how many homeless people are in America today. When I say this I mean that we don't have a clue.

The 2019 Annual Homeless Assessment Report Part I (AHAR), published by the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), estimates that 53,692 parents and children experienced homelessness during the agency’s January 2019 count.

Congress and local communities use HUD’s homelessness figures to help inform determinations about priorities for funding, services, and action. Yet educators, service providers, and child advocates say other data sources provide a more realistic picture of homelessness.

The HUD figures, derived from a “point-in-time” count, are significantly lower than those released by the Department of Education. Public schools identified more than 1.5 million homeless students in the 2017-2018 school year according to preliminary data from the Department of Education, a 10 percent increase since the previous school year.

In addition, the landmark 2017 study Missed Opportunities: Youth Homelessness in America, from Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago found that 4.2 million young people experienced unaccompanied homelessness over a 12-month period.

The HUD survey would be a joke if it had any humor value at all. Yet HUD is the most quoted official source.
We don't want to know how bad things are getting with the working class, so we don't make a honest effort to know the truth. Thus we come to laughable scenarios that have no reflection on reality.
Instead our culture obsesses over things that seem bizarre in a time where so many millions of lives are being destroyed: CRT, COVID vaccines, signaling virtue, celebrities, etc.
This certainly looks a lot like End of Empire.

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The Liberal Moonbat's picture

I'm young; I have plans to make, multiple layers now of setbacks to overcome, promises made to me by others long ago to see come due, and dreams to chase.

350,000,000 living anthropoids and ~9,826,675 km² of land aren't just going to sink into the sea (nor will rising sea levels treat them any differently from anything else at equivalent elevation), and while some will (in arguably one of the most tragic and bitter scenes of all of this) immigrate in search of greener, cleaner pastures, most can/will not...so WHAT NEXT???

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10 users have voted.

In the Land of the Blind, the one-eyed man is declared insane when he speaks of colors.

To paraphrase Jodie Foster: Human is not something to aspire to, it's something to get away from.

@The Liberal Moonbat @The Liberal Moonbat @The Liberal Moonbat ends on December 31,2021.

This week a report came out that over 100,000 currently enroled and counted NYC school kids are homeless. In NYC homeless children includes kids whose families float between relatives and shelters, no fixed addresses.

Think about this. Biggest City in a wealthy nation.

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NYCVG

The Liberal Moonbat's picture

@NYCVG I'm afraid that information by itself is not of much use to me, as I'm most-of-the-way on the other side of the empire from all that jazz, kind of with the opposite problems; luckily, we DO have and own our own home...but in a place with no opportunities, no access, and scarcely even any ontological recognition (and my REAL home, then one I was dragged from years ago? It's been paved over by a hideous doppelganger).

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4 users have voted.

In the Land of the Blind, the one-eyed man is declared insane when he speaks of colors.

To paraphrase Jodie Foster: Human is not something to aspire to, it's something to get away from.

So much of what we read is meaningless because it just parrots whatever press release comes across the medias desk. This is going to be a tough winter for the newly poor and homeless.

One thing out of all of this bleating about not finding enough workers is I can almost see the outlines of a general strike bringing the nation to a halt. We would need a strike fund for the workers with the most to lose. I doubt the wine and cheese liberals would be on board, because it would take money away from their pet causes and their wokeism precludes helping everyone in need.

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@Snode

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zed2's picture

I live in the outskirts of NYC and am starting to see signs of homeless people camping out in the woods around where I live. Something I had never seen before. It gets quite cold and wintry around here.

Its impossible to rent cheap anything around here. Rents are insanely high.

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14 users have voted.

@zed2 I keep my eyes open whenever we get near a town, and there are ALWAYS homeless near the railroad tracks outside of towns, no matter how small the town.

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zed2's picture

Wages should be high enough to rent places to live. Without a place to live homeless people remain so. Back in the 90s homeless families started having their children taken away during the Clinton Administration. In San Francisco the homeless population started to explode in the 90s. But families avoided the shelters because they were afraid of the Child Protective Services who sometimes decided to break up families and adopt out their children. The parents "crime" typically was just being poor. Its not like there were jobs for these unskilled people. There werent. Lots of people with advanced skills and even the employed are homeless now. Those that have cars and can live in them are lucky. Many dont.

If you live in an urban area you need a place to park a car to keep one, otherwise alternate side of the street laws, make it hard to keep a car if you are employed and work in the daytime your car may get towed away due to arbitrary laws that penalize owners who dont move their car every day. and require paying a large fine to ransom it out. All the poor people that I have known who owned vehicles in SF lost them this way. The fines multiply very fast..

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@zed2 how what displeases the well off becomes a law enforcement matter. Mental illness, homelessness, kids mouthing off in school, medical emergencies. Why solve the problem when you can dish out punishment. Much more satisfying.

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snoopydawg's picture

$20 billion could remedy this problem, but apparently the military needs the money more. Weird how the media doesn’t find this issue important enough to cover. Oh wait it’s owned by the military industrial complex. Never mind.

I tweeted this. Good essay.

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It is not until the tide goes out that you discover who has been swimming naked.

@snoopydawg
I was thinking last night "whatever happened to that eviction tsunami that they were talking about?"
So I did some searches, and when I realized that the eviction tsunami was roughly the same size as the missing workers mystery, I knew that I had a working theory.
The more that I thought about it, the more it made sense.

Now I could be wrong. Hell, I really hope that I'm wrong.
But if I'm not, we've got an enormous problem in this country that will eventually destabilize society.
Someone in the media needs to pay attention to the pains of the working class.

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@gjohnsit

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NYCVG

The Liberal Moonbat's picture

@gjohnsit The Richest Individuals On Earth: https://www.forbes.com/billionaires/

They are as mortal as anyone else; most of them aren't particularly special (one thing the "hard work VS institutional advantages" argument ALWAYS misses is the Big Kahuna they both fear too much to acknowledge: LUCK); they have names and addresses.

So what now?

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3 users have voted.

In the Land of the Blind, the one-eyed man is declared insane when he speaks of colors.

To paraphrase Jodie Foster: Human is not something to aspire to, it's something to get away from.

snoopydawg's picture

@snoopydawg

People like what you wrote. And see where the problem is coming from. Not that will change anything but it’s nice to make people aware of what’s happening I think.

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It is not until the tide goes out that you discover who has been swimming naked.

since the pandemic lockdown because of the closing of children's schools and daycare centers. For decades I've wondered how the dynamic between taking care of young children and both parents being employed would work out. And I've felt the only entity to benefit from the second income was mortgage banks, who've made obscene profits while families struggled.

So I've wondered if the emergency lockdown would force young families to assess the costs of both parents working and decide to forego the benefits of having 2 jobs. And the vaccine and exposure factors may force some parents to opt out of public schools and daycare altogether.

An increasing number of jobs in the U.S. don't pay enough for housing, obviously. But in the households with 2 incomes where there are children, there may be a new awareness that school and daycare are unaffordable, both spiritually and physically.

This is not to disagree with gjohnsit's premise at all, because I'm sure he's right, but I've wondered if a lot of parents have decided not to go back to their low paying jobs because they just don't benefit the family.

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snoopydawg's picture

@Linda Wood

I think quite a lot of parents did make that decision to either be at home parents or to home school their kids. And democrats just screwed many people by cutting daycare from their giveaway to the rich bill. Want more people back at work? Make daycare and other things affordable to them. You know that if we can see that then they can too.

How many people still alive that know there was a time when only dad worked and families were well off before banks insisted that business makes obscene profits over everything else?

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It is not until the tide goes out that you discover who has been swimming naked.

CB's picture

Homelessness Is Becoming a Crisis of Epic Proportions in the United States
June 19, 2021

Can you imagine what it would be like to not have a home? For many Americans, this is not something that they need to imagine because it is a daily reality. Nobody knows for sure how many homeless individuals there are in this country, but recent estimates range from “fewer than 600,000 to more than 1.5 million people”, and everyone agrees that the number has been growing. Even as the wealthy engage in wild bidding wars over the most desirable properties, more impoverished Americans are being forced into the streets with each passing day. There has always been homelessness in America, but here in 2021 it is rapidly becoming a crisis of epic proportions.
...
Ultimately, the vast majority of Americans are just a few months away from being homeless themselves.

In fact, now that a nationwide eviction moratorium is ending, we are being told that millions more Americans could soon be forced out into the streets…

MILLIONS of renters face eviction as a nationwide ban is set to end in two weeks.

It comes as 5.7 million Americans – nearly 14% of all renters nationwide – had fallen behind on their rent in April.

The study by the National Equity Atlas revealed that tenants owed nearly $20 billion in rent, with low-income people among those worst affected.

...
During the pandemic, the federal government has borrowed and spent trillions and trillions of dollars, and the Federal Reserve has pumped trillions and trillions of dollars into the financial system, and yet the suffering of those at the bottom of the economic food chain has gotten much, much worse.

Something is very wrong with that picture.

No matter what our leaders do, the homelessness crisis in this country just seems to keep escalating. Vast numbers of our fellow citizens will be sleeping on the streets tonight, and many more will soon be joining them.

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snoopydawg's picture

@CB @CB

when they get evicted. Either from being locked out of the homes like mentioned here or because they can’t afford to move it to storage places for numbers of reasons. And how much of it is still on their credit cards and they still have to pay them off? It’s a cruel system that is easily remedied.

Another thing is many people are homeless because of medical debt. Or bank fraud. Or…

Edited content. Not helpful.

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It is not until the tide goes out that you discover who has been swimming naked.

zed2's picture

people went. But they were unsuccessful. Without any means of asking them, they were just gone.

LA set up a really Orwellian system to track the homeless but most homeless people felt it lessenned their chances of getting help. Because most of them were deemed less deserving of help if they managed to navigate it.

Basically it was a system designed to eliminate "people who had done everything right" and/or connect them to crimes, etc. that lessened their eligibility to get any benefits. Thats always these tracking systems intent. Terminate people from any entitlement to aid.

It cannot - they are unwilling to address any of the root causes of homelessness. GATS made it so they are not allowed to help people. Dems have been lying about that to you all since 1995.

Everything changed radically in 1995 with the WTO and GATS.. WHat will they do in the near future? Probably something like Robodebt in Australia.

~https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=robodebt

in a cashless society everything will be based on your digital account. So it will all be tracked and controlled. If you have no money to buy luxury goods you wont be able to travel where you would buy them. You maynot be able to use toll roads, required by GATS to pay for infrastructure or the jobs seem to require they be bid out, to the lowest bidder internationally. The networking jobs too also mkust be farmed out to the firms that bid the lowest. Lots of that kind of work, putting remote villages on the net is being done in India and Africa. They have the most experience in it. Technically, the jobs, ae the same. Its just that communities looking to get jobs will lose out. The foreign worker are much much cheaper.

Sp, short summary, the world has changed. Govt procurement n trade deals requires infrastructure jobs be rewards for bidding the cheapest. This wil push wages down a lot as is its intent.

The AGP (agreement on govt procurement) which we signed just a few years ago is payback to the most unequal countries for playing our trade game. The jobs will likely be bid out which could prove embarrassing for the political class. The new toll roads will require a digital account with enough money in them to pay the tolls. Also when people make deposits - they have an income which may kick them off benefits. Rescission will come back in healthcare. Its a kind of clawback where service providers have the money that was paid to them for you clawed back, then they may have the option of rebilling you which will immediately debit the money from your account, Rebiolling somebody with a serious health problem back to the beginning of the policy could leave people with huge bills they must pay before they can use the card they need to use to drive down the road. Rescission's modern version is all digital. Its intended to keep the poor out of the new "smart cities" .Also it enables people tracking and health evaluation by GPS. By interpolation it can extract your heart rate from the minutest 2 mm motions of your bodyh due to your heart beat. This is very valuable to health insurance copmpanies in pricing your health insurance.

If it turn out you were not eligible for benefits while you had a serious illness and received treatment, you'll find that the benefits paid on your behalf get clawed back, like Australia's robodebt. They'll rebill you at the uninsured rate which is often much higher. Retroactively. It will keep the poor out of sight.

Collectively, there is a discussion going on about this kind of thing, look up "digital poorhouse" to find it. The phrase is from the book "Automating Inequality"

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9 users have voted.

@zed2

in a cashless society everything will be based on your digital account.

I'm VERY paranoid about eliminating cash. To me this issue is like COVID vaccines to other people.
Getting rid of cash removes anonymity in transactions. Getting rid of cash means all transactions are debt transactions.
That means that the government, and even private institutions, can simply cut you off from being able to function and live in society if they so choose.

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@gjohnsit TIA---Total Information Access,

Not Just for Scary fiction any more.

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NYCVG

CB's picture

@gjohnsit
to ensure people have been vaccinated and they're up to date? You cannot buy a plane or train ticket in Canada if you don't have a passport. BTW, the country is planning a digital currency.

Vaccine passports during the COVID-19 pandemic
North America

Canada:

No plans for a vaccine passport (grey)
Partial vaccine passport (yellow)
Vaccine passport or plans for a vaccine passport (blue)

United States

A map showing which US states have proposed or implemented (green), banned (red), or partially banned (yellow) COVID-19 vaccine passports. Gray indicates that the state has neither implemented or banned COVID-19 vaccine passports. Also included is states that have significant localities with COVID-19 vaccine passports (Aqua). Green includes states which have created a vaccine passport mobile application, but the application is not mandated to be used in the public or private sector. As of October 2021, no US states had mandated use of vaccine passports.

I believe COVID passports will be a gateway for digital currency in the world. The US is currently the leading bulwark against this (but only by conservative controlled States) due to the Constitution.

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@CB

I believe COVID passports will be a gateway for digital currency in the world. The US is currently the leading bulwark against this (but only by conservative controlled States) due to the Constitution.

You already know what I think - the pandemic will be done in a couple months.
If you want to know where I see the pressure for an all digital currency, look at the unsustainable, unpayable debt levels, and negative interest rates. Keep your eyes on the central bankers.

Here's a question worth pondering: if we had a bank holiday tomorrow, and this also meant the credit card companies (which are either partners with the banks or owned by the banks), how would you buy your food for the week?
Keeping in mind that a bank holiday means the ATMs won't function.
I'm betting that most people don't have any cash on them other than what's currently in their pocket.

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CB's picture

@gjohnsit
Did you know that the US has now more surveillance cameras per capita than China?

I don't think we'll see the end of this pandemic. We will just see waves of infections getting more shallower which each passage. The US curve is currently trending slightly higher instead of bottoming and flattening out and we are just at the beginning of the influenza season that will last until next May. The global curve is definitely on the rise. In any event we will probably see another virus hit before 2025.

There's just too many people on the face of the earth and we are messing up the place big time. It's time we stopped breeding and eating meat or they'll have to do something even more drastic. That's the word from the DAVOS crowd.

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@CB @CB
You have to keep people entertained.
So they have to keep changing what we must fear otherwise the customer gets bored.
Even if COVID somehow defies all historical trends and doesn't go away next year, the ruling elites would have to change the theme anyway.

After communism it was drug dealers. Then it was Islamic terrorists. Now it's a bad flu.
Who will be the next Hitler? Russia? China? Leftists?

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CB's picture

@gjohnsit
The sheeple are easy to herd. TPTB get to practice it every 2 years in the US.

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CB's picture

@gjohnsit

Here's a question worth pondering: if we had a bank holiday tomorrow, and this also meant the credit card companies (which are either partners with the banks or owned by the banks), how would you buy your food for the week?
Keeping in mind that a bank holiday means the ATMs won't function.
I'm betting that most people don't have any cash on them other than what's currently in their pocket.

A digital currency doesn't require banks, credit cards or ATM's. A $20 cell phone is all that is required. The Chinese no longer carry cash - they can transfer funds from phone to phone.

China has given away millions in its digital yuan trials. This is how it works
Mar 4 2021

GUANGZHOU, China — China is arguably leading the world in developing a national digital currency, a project it has been working on since 2014.

The People’s Bank of China (PBOC) has been spearheading work on the digital yuan, a so-called central bank digital currency (CBDC) that aims to replace some of the cash in circulation.

Real world trials are already underway in the world’s second-largest economy. Here’s what we know so far about the digital yuan or its official name — the Digital Currency Electronic Payment (DCEP).

What is the digital yuan?

It’s effectively a way for the central bank to digitalize bank notes and coins in circulation. The Chinese market is already very advanced in cashless payments. The digital yuan would be a way to speed that process up.

It will be legal tender in China and no interest will be paid on it.

“The use of cash is decreasing. Eventually cash will be replaced by something in digital format. That is one of the big drivers behind this,” Yan Xiao, project lead for digital trade at the World Economic Forum, told CNBC.
...

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@CB

A digital currency doesn't require banks, credit cards or ATM's. A $20 cell phone is all that is required. The Chinese no longer carry cash - they can transfer funds from phone to phone.

Unless it's a non-national currency like bitcoin, then it's no different from a credit card.

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CB's picture

@gjohnsit

Here's a question worth pondering: if we had a bank holiday tomorrow, and this also meant the credit card companies (which are either partners with the banks or owned by the banks), how would you buy your food for the week?
Keeping in mind that a bank holiday means the ATMs won't function.
I'm betting that most people don't have any cash on them other than what's currently in their pocket.

The NEW Chinese digital money system is run by the government. It's only similar to the private AliPay, WeChat Pay and Union Pay in that it uses a Q code for transactions. These payment systems are identical in function to our debit cards which use chips or magnetic strips.

The eYuan is a cryptocurrency and uses a wallet. They will supply digital "wallets" with chips that can be read for those who don't have a cell phone at minimal cost. This means you are effectively carrying on your person all the "cash" you possess. Money transfers go direct from wallet to wallet and don't need an internet connection. All these transactions will be recorded in the wallet.

Private banking services like AliPay can set up debit accounts on top of your cash reserves if you want to borrow funds but that function will require an internet connection unless you are preapproved.

China’s Digital Currency Is About To Disrupt Money

A lengthy article in The Wall Street Journal, China creates its own digital currency, a first for major economy, outlines the likely impact of Beijing’s initiative and the strategic possibilities it offers in terms of avoiding US blockades of its companies, how this will boost its role in international transactions, while allowing it to monitor its economy in real time.
...

The reason I put this together with the vaccine passports and video surveillance is these are gateway "drugs" to get the serfs "trained" just like in China. Canada, Australia and the EU are harbingers of what is to come in the US.

Never let a crisis go to waste. Full spectrum dominance is on the way. Brave New World indeed.

Maybe you can do a diary? You are very good at it. I still find it extremely difficult to find my words since my ischemic stroke last spring.

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QMS's picture

@CB

next we will see the credit card companies step up and offer to include your health
information in their digital chips at no additional charge. Totally secure I'm sure.
Just ask Equifax Wink

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5 users have voted.

Walmart is attempting to implement cashless pay in their stores now. Their latest remodels leave very few manned checklanes. Their self check requires you pay by card. The lines at the manned checklanes are long. They said it had to do with a change shortage. I have noticed, though in my travels to various stores to work on their inventory systems, that some stores have reverted back to normal while others have not. Apparently some communities took exception and stopped shopping there to the point they backed off, while others they are keeping up the ruse. I have never really shopped there with the exception of buying a snack or something to drink. I now am in the habit of packing my food so I don't have to. Winco a regional discount chain has seen a jump in sales because they only accept cash or a debit card. What I know is that every other chain did this for awhile in this area but most have gone back to normal and only 3 out of 5 walmarts I service are still claiming to be short on change.

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snoopydawg's picture

@pswaterspirit

2 of the 4 self checkouts says that due to the coin shortage people have to use cards to pay. Doesn’t make sense if you leave 2 others open to cash. And yes there seemed to be a sudden shortage of change just as the close down happened. I caught on to that right away, but not the checkouts..sometimes I’m slow but I usually get there. Thanks for the assist.

I started calling out the cashless system about 4 years ago and tied it to the stock market crash and the bail in banks got authorization to do from one of the omnibus bills congress passed. Dodd Frank made it so banks didn’t have to go before congress to get permission to help themselves to our money. You can look it up.

Remember when Obama told the banks to be grateful to him for standing in front of the people who wanted their heads after they crashed the global economy? Grrrr lots of bad thoughts to that wanker! Now he’s lecturing us on climate change whilst flying around the world causing more damage than we do all year. That’s after he failed to do a damn thing except for more drilling and fracking and more wars that are a huge effect on it.

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It is not until the tide goes out that you discover who has been swimming naked.

CB's picture

@pswaterspirit
has been changing gradually during the last year. There are only 3 rows of two cash registers left with at lea