Edward Snowden

Edward Snowden shares a laugh at the government's expense

One thing hasn’t changed since the first authoritarian burned the first book: having your book banned is very, very good for an author’s sales. If your objective is to keep a book out of the hands of people, yelling "You shouldn't read this book. I forbid it!" is a doomed strategy.

Whitney Webb’s ‘Edward Snowden to Address Select Audience in Israel: Will He Take On Israel’s Surveillance State?’

It’s subtitled: ‘Since having gained prominence as a whistleblower, Snowden has been a vocal advocate for free speech, freedom of the press, and privacy. However, the Israeli government routinely violates these rights for Palestinians as well as Israelis’, Oct. 10, 2018

As everything at MintPressNews is listed as Creative Commons, I’ll paste in a lot of the most illuminating parts of it.  She covers a lot as per her subtitle, but those aren’t the parts I’m really interested in, nor am I sure it’s the same for Webb. What I’d like to know is whether or not you see what I see.  Some of her internal links made me wish I’d known of her years ago, as she’s shorthanded so many of the diaries I’d gone to great pains to produce, as I’d started writing about the Intercept in 2013, and of course WikiLeaks before that.

36 Years Down the Republican Rabbit Hole

In "Alice's Adventures in Wonderland," Lewis Carroll tells the story of Alice, a more-or-less average curious, rational child, who, on a dreamy summer day, chases a waistcoat-wearing white rabbit down a rabbit hole into a bizarre land. In this, and in a later book ("Through the Looking-Glass"), we find many strange characters producing many puzzling and irrational quotes. For instance, we have the giant talking egg, Humpty Dumpty:

When I use a word,' Humpty Dumpty said in rather a scornful tone, 'it means just what I choose it to mean—neither more nor less.'

'The question is,' said Alice, 'whether you can make words mean so many different things.'

'The question is,' said Humpty Dumpty, 'which is to be master—that's all.'

And we have the Queen of Hearts, who is quite quick to propose simple, brutal solutions:

[The King] called the Queen, who was passing at the moment, 'My dear! I wish you would have this cat removed!'
The Queen had only one way of settling all difficulties, great or small. 'Off with his head!' she said, without even looking round.

... and, when the Dormouse spoke out of turn in court:

'Collar that Dormouse,' the Queen shrieked out. 'Behead that Dormouse! Turn that Dormouse out of court! Suppress him! Pinch him! Off with his whiskers!'

An observer of American politics since 1980 or so, might well picture oneself as, like Alice, having gone down the rabbit-hole to find many strange Republicans, who, like the characters in Wonderland, issue puzzling and irrational quotes. Over the decades, here are just a few of the characters we have met, as we went down, down, down ...

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