An important question: Is this real?

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I don't believe Warren about M4A. I think she'll settle for a public option at the first sign of resistance.
I also don't believe that she'll stand up to the MIC.

But when it comes to Wall Street, well, this could very well be real.

CNBC spoke to one executive who said they were considering supporting Trump in the general election fundraising cycle to keep Warren from winning.

"You're in a box because you're a Democrat and you're thinking, 'I want to help the party, but she's going to hurt me, so I'm going to help President Trump,'" the executive said.
...
The executives' comments came weeks after CNBC anchor Jim Cramer said many on Wall Street are afraid of a potential Warren presidency and believe "she's got to be stopped."

The senator tweeted "I approve this message" at the time, while supporters observed that the Warren campaign could benefit from a campaign ad using Wall Street's own words.

On Thursday, political observers again said big banks are advertising Warren's strengths as they share their concerns over her plans to rein in Wall Street's power—not just with her tax plan but also her proposals to limit executive compensation, force private equity firms to pay the debts of the companies they buy, and hold executives accountable for their firms' wrongdoing.

Because of Obama a lot of people don't trust headlines like this.
And I don't blame them.
OTOH, Warren actually has a good track record on this issue.

Consider this Wikileaks reveal from 2016.

Sen. Elizabeth Warren attempted to influence Hillary Clinton's personnel picks, presenting the campaign with a list of potential hires, the latest batch of WikiLeaks emails shows.
...
The email is a window into Warren's "personnel is policy" push aimed at limiting Wall Street executives from getting top jobs in Washington. The Democratic Party adopted the mantra as part of its campaign platform this year.

Warren is on guard against Clinton tapping business-friendly administration officials from the Rubin wing of the party — a case that Warren has made directly to the Democratic nominee and indirectly through speeches and nomination fights. Last month, Warren said a Clinton administration should not be staffed with officials linked to BlackRock, Citigroup or Morgan Stanley.

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Cassiodorus's picture

Nothing else will do. While everyone's eyes are fixated on the Presidential candidates, the Democratic Party elites are doubtless looking for new ways to help Republicans win, you know, like they did in 2010 and 2014:

https://www.politifact.com/punditfact/statements/2015/jan/25/cokie-rober...

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"Our national nightmare is over -- time for a new one." - anonymous response to "Biden's" statement

@Cassiodorus richsplaining

Democratic Party activist and MSNBC guest claimed Friday that voters in support of Senator Bernie Sanders instead of Elizabeth Warren are revealing their "sexism."

Democratic strategist and former vice president of campaigns for the Center for American Progress, Emily Tisch Sussman, responded to several recent polls showing Warren surging ahead and placing herself next to former Vice President Joe Biden atop the 2020 candidates. Speaking with MSNBC's Craig Melvin Friday, Tisch Sussman relayed a comment about how Warren is so clearly a better candidate than Sanders that a vote for him indicates one is simply sexist against a female candidate for president.

Other critics noted Tisch Sussman is the daughter of billionaires and personally attacked her wealthy, New York establishment background.

"There is a ceiling, there is nowhere to go, there is no 'up' to go," she told the MSNBC panel Friday morning. "I actually heard someone saying something that I thought was an interesting point. But basically, if you are still supporting Sanders as opposed to Warren, it's kind of showing your sexism."
...
A male guest on MSNBC's The Contenders segment Friday agreed with Tisch Sussman's suggestion that supporting Sanders over Warren is a "sexist" move.

However, social media responses blasted Tisch Sussman's "sexism" claim and flipped the identity politics argument on its head in several comments. "If supporting Sanders over Warren means you're a sexist, then supporting Warren over Sanders means you're an anti-semite. It's only fair," replied one Twitter user. Many replies rebuked the comment as "divisive" and "unhelpful" to the Democratic presidential race as a whole.

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@gjohnsit Voted for Stein last time.

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dervish's picture

@gjohnsit to such tripe.

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"Obama promised transparency, but Assange is the one who brought it."

Alligator Ed's picture

@Cassiodorus the second half of the article, while describing the magnitude of losses doesn't clarify why this chronic Democrat weakening occurred. Is this part of a devious neoliberal-globalist plot to destroy Amerika? I don't know.

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@Alligator Ed

Methinks it seems more like a global neo-lib plot to make their world view the only one acceptable to the pundit / writing class. Crazy as it seems, the talking heads seem to like being so persuaded. Contrary notions are like losing pensions. There is no future in those being paid to delineate future tendencies, unless it toes the lines of the mala-fracture industry.

Sheesh. Whatever happened to truth, exposure and hard hitting journalism?
Bought out or smothered with foolish whims?
Ain 't helping us out much, fer sure.

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Centaurea's picture

@QMS
when your personal goal is to become one of those in power.

From what I've seen, the majority of today's "journalists" want to be part of the global aristocracy.

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"Don't go back to sleep ... Don't go back to sleep ... Don't go back to sleep."
~Rumi

"If you want revolution, be it."
~Caitlin Johnstone

Cassiodorus's picture

@Alligator Ed nobody called it a "devious Vichy plot to destroy France." People recognized the Vichy regime as a collaborationist regime, pure and simple. What's the problem with understanding the Democrats as collaborationists now?

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"Our national nightmare is over -- time for a new one." - anonymous response to "Biden's" statement

Or Obamacare Bronze which is nothing.

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I've seen lots of changes. What doesn't change is people. Same old hairless apes.

@The Voice In the Wilderness
but not enough.
A public option would have been enough 10 years ago.

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@gjohnsit is today's civil unions. Several election cycles back it was considered progressive and substantial reform.

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Unabashed Liberal's picture

@The Voice In the Wilderness @The Voice In the Wilderness

the Sanders and Jayapal proposals convert OM/TM to 'managed care,' several (that I've read) of the Public Option proposals basically convert OM/TM to the equivalent of a Medicare Advantage program.

Just speaking for me and Mr M--"no thanks!" Smile We already receive 100% of all medical services covered by OM/TM. And, our private Medigap insurer "has no power to deny medical coverage." (obviously, unlike almost every other type of medical insurance product) Bottom line--our level of medical care/coverage should be extended to Everyone. And could be.

To clarify, all services that our public insurance program--Original/Traditional Medicare authorize--the insurer must pick up. No questions asked. Also, there are no provider networks in OM/TM. Nor, any need for referrals to see specialists, or, to obtain permission to get second, or even third/fourth medical opinions.

Which is to say--we are totally unrestricted in seeking additional medical consultations and/or care. (obviously, this is within reason; so, one can't insist on an appendectomy, if the appendix is normal Biggrin )

This is exactly what we need to 'expand.' Not a managed care system with a RX formulary of almost all generics, riddled with so-called "Utilization Management" tools--which is simply an euphemism for 'managed care.'

BTW, I might note, that although both Sanders' and Jayapal's proposals touched on virtually ALL of our public/state health care systems/programs, yet, they were very careful NOT to take away their excellent care through the OFA. For that matter, there was nary even a mention of this excellent medical 'perk' (in their UMFA proposals). A perk, BTW, which is reserved only for a handful of elites.

Routine care

OAP provides members of Congress with physicals and routine examinations, on-site X-rays and lab work, physical therapy and referrals to medical specialists from military hospitals and private medical practices. When specialists are needed, they are brought to the Capitol, often at no charge to members of Congress.[4]

Members of Congress do not pay for the individual services they receive at the OAP, nor do they submit claims through their federal employee health insurance policies. Instead, as of 2009, members pay a flat, annual fee of $503 for all the care they receive. The rest of the cost of their care is paid for by federal funding, from the U.S. Navy budget. The annual fee has not changed significantly since 1992.[4]

Actually, as someone who has received absolutely excellent treatment (at active duty military facilities, including a major medical center in the Lower 48), I wouldn't object to just opening up their cushy system to Everyone. Could use some of the hundreds, if not thousands, of unoccupied federal buildings that are sitting empty, and rotting, by converting them to medical facilities (since, obviously, what's available would not be sufficient).

Remember, the OAP provides medical care for the President, Vice-President, POTUS, and all 535 members of Congress. (Also, in emergencies, the OAP treats/stabilizes the condition of folks who fall ill while visiting some federal buildings/facilities.)

IMO, we should argue that we are entitled to medical care equal to theirs.

Have a nice weekend.

[Edited: Deleted 'receive.' 'to' replaced 'for.']

Mollie

“Dogs have given us their absolute all. We are the center of their universe. We are the focus of their love and faith and trust. They serve us in return for scraps. It is without a doubt the best deal man has ever made.” ~~Roger Caras
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Everyone thinks they have the best dog, and none of them are wrong.

@Unabashed Liberal @Unabashed Liberal
I can't comment without knowing what you are saying.
EDIT: Typos

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I've seen lots of changes. What doesn't change is people. Same old hairless apes.

edg's picture

@The Voice In the Wilderness @davidgmillsatty

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Unabashed Liberal's picture

@The Voice In the Wilderness

and Traditional Medicare.

Of course, they are one and the same--just two different ways of referring to the original 1965 Medicare program that Johnson signed into law.

Oh, might add--the UMFA proposals would raise costs for many seniors, since the funding model is that of the ACA (which relies heavily upon cost shifting)

Because the ACA model is based upon household income, you could have a 90-year-old widow paying the same or more, than, say the "Duggar Family." (that is, before they became 'famous,' since Daddy Jim Bob Duggar made a pretty meager income, prior to their notoriety) Somehow, not sure how that's very helpful to elderly folks living on a 'fixed' income. Bear in mind, because OM/TM was designed exclusively for elderly folks on a fixed income (and disabled folks), by it's very configuration, it's heavily subsidized--without a heavy cost shifting component (to the Medicare beneficiary).

Needless to say, I'm fully on board with expanding the coverage from 80% to 100%, so that there is no necessity for the Medigap policy which picks up 20% of the costs not covered by the base program. And, including ALL RX's in Part B of Medicare, is a must. Also, fully in support of throwing in other coverage, as well.

But, no need to reinvent the wheel. That would give too much opportunity for lawmakers to 'make mischief' by implementing so-called 'cost savings'--through "Utilization Management." (read, 'managed care' tools)

Again, staunchly support a program that includes Everyone. From birth.

Mollie

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Everyone thinks they have the best dog, and none of them are wrong.

@Unabashed Liberal

Another elephant in the room is Long Term Care.
And at present, you have to impoverish yourself to get it or impoverish yourself before you need it with monstrous Long term care insurance premiums. Premiums for my wife and I would consume my entire SS + CSRS pension, leaving us to live on IRA withdrawals and my wife's $1K spousal SS. It still would only cover a year of coverage and we would be back to impoverishment for Medicaid.
I really wish we would have Death with Dignity Laws. If I can never leave the nursing home, I would choose suicide rather than deny my child and her children their legacy.
My grandfather committed suicide by starvation rather than life in the nursing home with a colostomy bag. He was 92 and my grandmother had died some years ago. Officially he had a heart attack. I asked my father, "You told me the doctor said he had the heart of a forty year old in August. What gives?" My father told me that Grandpa had told him, "I'm not going to live like this." And proceeded to fake eating, regurgitating his food in the toilet. His weakened heart gave way when his body sugars fell too low. My father was ashamed of him, but I'm proud. He was only a peasant immigrant with a fifth grade education, but I hope I have his pride and will of iron when my time comes. A hard man from a hard background, but 100% a man.

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I've seen lots of changes. What doesn't change is people. Same old hairless apes.

Unabashed Liberal's picture

@The Voice In the Wilderness

since yesterday, trying to remember 'who' the other former/retired Feds were here, other than (Big) Al and me.

I was thinking that there were, at least, a couple more, and, maybe a postal service person, as well. (IOW, when you mentioned your CSRS pension, you gave me the answer. Wink ) The reason I wondered, was that I was hoping to be able to tap someone else's brain regarding federal personnel policies (if needed), while following the so-called 'whistleblower' saga. Basically, I'm pretty familiar with them, because of having received a lot of HR training while a union steward, and, due to learning a lot during my own suit. OTOH, my memory's definitely not what it used to be. Biggrin

Your point about LTC is well-taken. Mr M and I think we've probably been very lucky, in that none of our four parents needed to be in a long term care (skilled nursing) facility--aside from having several weeks of intensive physical therapy to recover from leg fractures/surgery.

BTW, Mr M heard this about the prospective raise for federal retirements/annuities, Social Security, military pay, including VA Disability, SSDI, etc.

In addition, the trustees' report projected that the Social Security cost-of-living adjustment will increase by a modest 1.2% in 2020 — less than half the size of this year's COLA. A 1.2% COLA would increase the average retirement benefit by about $17 to $1,478 a month in 2020 and boost the maximum benefit for someone who retires at the full retirement age next year by about $34 to $2,895 a month. The 2020 COLA will be announced in October.

Swell.

/snark intended

Bad

Mollie

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Everyone thinks they have the best dog, and none of them are wrong.

@Unabashed Liberal
Half my Federal career as a Navy civilian, then half my working life in the private sector working for big corporations and small, then a final stretch as a Postal employee (CSRS offset actually). Both the NAVY and the PO had that sense of dedication that was missing in the private sector. When we new hires took our postal oath of allegiance, the personnel lady giving the oath told us "Welcome to the postal family." And it was. Like all large families, some shirkers, some bad apples, but mostly a group looking out for each other and our mission. I wasn't there long before I realized that management was useless and the whole thing was held together by the dedication of the senior clerks who knew how the mail is supposed to flow and the senior technicians who knew how to keep the sorting machines running. Our shift manager came in drunk most nights and slept in his office with the lights off (night shift). We kept the mail flowing despite him.

I did good work in the private sector and designed many useful machines, gaining two patents (which my employment contract automatically assigned to my employers as "works for hire"), the small firm I worked for had pride of doing top flight work, but there was never the sense of public dedication that came from CS employment.
The postal work was APWU. I still have my dues withheld from my pension. Solidarity Forever!

EDIT: I was unemployed by the tech wreck and talked a lot at the mailbox with our mail carrier. When I told her that I had been hired by the USPS, she came out of the truck, hugged me and said "Welcome to the Postal family". When she delivered my blue retirement book, she grinned from ear to ear and said, "He's really going to do it!" and came out of the truck and hugged me again. A year later she retired and I hugged her.

EDIT2: rereading your remarks about "Mr M", I guess it's Sister after all.

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I've seen lots of changes. What doesn't change is people. Same old hairless apes.

Unabashed Liberal's picture

@The Voice In the Wilderness @The Voice In the Wilderness

(Big) Al.

Update: Sorry, posted this comment before I read all the way down, and saw your additional comment--that I'm a 'Sister' Biggrin

Hey, no harm, no foul. (as they say)

Pleasantry

Mollie

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Everyone thinks they have the best dog, and none of them are wrong.

Unabashed Liberal's picture

@The Voice In the Wilderness

Which is probably dumb on my part. For some reason, I thought that USPS was affiliated with AFGE. (American Federation Of Government Employees). Hey, good on you for still paying dues.

At one time, AFGE was (IMO) the Gold Standard of unions. Not anymore, though. They've (AFGE management/top folks) sold out. Still, I will always sing their praises, in that they were top notch up to, and through, most of the 80's.

You have a very interesting background. Thanks for sharing.

Sometime, (if this topic should come up again) if you care to elaborate, would be curious to know if you felt that you received decent medical care during your Navy years.

My own personal experience with military medical care was with the Air Force and the Army. (In some locations, the USAF medical facilities were small medical clinics, not full-fledged hospitals.) Twice, we medevaced down to what (today) is Joint Base Lewis-McChord (Washington State) from Interior Alaska. The Medical Center care Mr M received (neurological surgery) was excellent. Including the medevac flights, themselves.

I accompanied him on the medevac flights at no charge to us--was considered his 'personal medical attendant.' Will never forget how some of the flight crew were so solicitous toward me when I was descending down the stairs of the C-5 or C-130 (can't remember which). Apparently, they mistook me for the patient. Never did figure out why! Smile

Upon discharge, the bill we incurred was less than $20 for the non-medical 'incidentals' (lotion, Kleenex, etc.) used during Mr M's almost week-long hospital stay.

Seems almost surreal, now.

Mollie

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Everyone thinks they have the best dog, and none of them are wrong.

@Unabashed Liberal
The big strike in 1976 was under the united union. That splintered and now there is the

1. APWU American Postal workers Union - clerks and maintenance
2. Mail Handlers Union (too lazy to look up the proper name)
3. Mail carriers union (ditto)
4. Rural Mail carriers Union (ditto)
5. I forget the name and who is in it. I think maybe the postal inspectors and firefighters.
Got to go, I'll edit this later after I look it up.

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I've seen lots of changes. What doesn't change is people. Same old hairless apes.

Unabashed Liberal's picture

@The Voice In the Wilderness

listing, in that it makes it clear that the Postal Service was/is quite heavily unionized. (Good!)

And, please disregard my comment, "Sometime, (if this topic should come up again) if you care to elaborate, would be curious to know if you felt that you received decent medical care during your Navy years."

Sorry, initially misread it your comment--thought you were both a civilian employee of USN, and, served a stint in the Navy.

Have a good one.

Mollie

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Everyone thinks they have the best dog, and none of them are wrong.

@Unabashed Liberal
I don't favor the English model. I favor the German model. You choose your own doctor who is a private practitioner not a government employee. Insurance pays 100% of the fee. Insurance is paid for by payroll deduction. Fees and medicine prices are regulated by the government because the free market breaks down when you are talking about the price to stay alive and whole.

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I've seen lots of changes. What doesn't change is people. Same old hairless apes.

Dawn's Meta's picture

@The Voice In the Wilderness The primary care is less a gate keeper than a conduit to higher levels of expertise and specialization.

Never have been turned down for a referral. Some specialists are real patient/client advocates.

Cost for half hour with primary care is 27 euros paid on the spot. The Carte Vitale (basic health care) provides 80% directly repaid to our bank with no paperwork in about a week. The remainder is a top up insurance also connected via account numbers, again no paperwork.

Specialist like an allergist is at most 150 euros but much less for tests and everything.

Over 550 euros, there is a plan ahead request or if going to ER (rare here) just gets billed direct to the national plan and the gap insurance. We never see a bill.

I'm with you on OM/TM having been through the network bs with my mom's glaucoma. The problem is in many states, especially rural ones, like Oregon, there are almost no doctors 'willing' to take OM/TM covered patients. Not enough in it for them.

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A society grows great when old men plant trees in whose shade they know they shall never sit. Allegedly Greek, but more possibly fairly modern quote.

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WoodsDweller's picture

until/unless Warren wins the nomination. At that point she will "not unilaterally disarm" and accept corporate money for the general election, and the money will flood in until she is 100% corrupted.

Business as usual.

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"The greatest shortcoming of the human race is our inability to understand the exponential function." -- Albert Bartlett
"A species that is hurtling toward extinction has no business promoting slow incremental change." -- Caitlin Johnstone

dervish's picture

Enter "Warren grills" into YouTube's search function.

I think she's the real deal, on this and most other issues. In any case, she's the best you'll likely get.

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"Obama promised transparency, but Assange is the one who brought it."

@dervish really like her in the lead to the 2016 cycle when he waited for her to announce her candidacy and presumably then endorse her and not run himself.

Her wealth tax proposal is a bold stroke, certainly a good start. Even Bernie has taken notice and is beginning to adopt the idea with an even bolder plan, which I prefer. But credit Liz for getting the ball rolling.

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Wally's picture

@wokkamile

Just because MSM doesn't do any fact checking anymore when it comes to favored candidates doesn't mean it ain't so.

As usual, Warren is just a weak tea imitator.

And yes, Bernie's plan is bolder and more just than anything "capitalist to the bones" Warren has simiulated.

I will only vote for a socialist.

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dervish's picture

@Wally so that the only viable choices will be Bernie or Warren. I expect Warren will take it, as the centrists will settle for her rather than vote for Bernie.

Bernie would be great as well. I support both.

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"Obama promised transparency, but Assange is the one who brought it."

Wally's picture

@dervish

Warren will not get independent voters supporting her like Bernie can.

She won't win back the Obama -> Trump voters like Bernie will.

She won't get Black voters like Bernie will.

Her supporters are pretty much all white, professional, academic or managerial folks. Very little working class base.

She is already moving more and more to the center backtracking on M4A and we haven't even had one primary yet. She seems to be working with the Hillary camp.

She's capitalist to the bone.

Trump will tear her to shreds on her fake claim to Native American ancestry which she used to deny real Native Americans the opportunities she instead was afforded.

She's already shown she reacts poorly to Trump's baiting her.

Weak tea at best and I don't even like tea.

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Shahryar's picture

@Wally

and we (who don't support her because she's a Republican) will get blamed.

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Wally's picture

@Shahryar

Warren is gonna get whacked more and more by the Obama-Biden faction of the party as we get closer to the first primaries, and these attacks will ratchet up more and more after New Year's Day 2020.

I really don't know at this point how the primaries and the convention will pan out, but I am pretty set in my opinion that only Bernie can beat Trump.

But we'll have a pretty good idea of who the nominee will be come as soon as Super Tuesday, March 3 given the new inclusion of the California primary on that date.

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@Shahryar Perfect.

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"We'll know our disinformation program is complete when everything the American public believes is false." ---- William Casey, CIA Director, 1981

Alligator Ed's picture

@Wally but the DNC will never let him get the nomination.

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Wally's picture

@Alligator Ed

. . . come March 3, 2020. Super Tuesday.

Certainly, the 1% are doing everything they can do to stop Bernie and the critical mass of folks supporting his candidacy.

But this time around, they've been proving themselves amazingly adept at allegorically shooting each other in various extremities, wounding but not killing each other off.

So if and when I deem Bernie has no chance, I'll let you know by pulling a Homer disappearing act into the apolitical universe of working class hedonism:

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by Wall Street bullshit, and may have been inclined to genuinely try to push back. I don't get that feeling anymore. She seems a bit squirrelly now. And Wall Street publicly complaining about her feels like a ruse to me. I think she would completely cave in to the lobbyists.

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@entrepreneur cave in, so to speak. She will put forth one grand idea after another, introduce legislation over and over, go all in fuming against the greed of Wall Street and corps, coming up with one fantastic sounding piece of legislation after another, over and over again. She knows none of those have a snow ball's chance in hell of passing but it sure looks good. And she is surely not the only politician to do so either. And yup, the fact the MSM is now coming out and saying she's public enemy #1 to Wall Street is just another piece of misdirection. She can use the same lame excuses Obama did, all Repugnant's fault!, and people will believe it - I sure as hell did out of Obama for far too long.

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Only a fool lets someone else tell him who his enemy is. Assata Shakur

article about the inside the WH tussle in 2010 when the CFPB was created was interesting and showed a Warren fighting against the big money interests. So we're seeing some consistency on overall economic issues and trying to look out for the 99%.

Maybe some of those CEOs read that Politico article and got scared.

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Roy Blakeley's picture

Maybe they would prefer to run against Warren rather than Bernie. Biden's a senile pedophile with verbal diarrhea. Harris has flamed out. The rest are barely credible so Warren is seen as better for Wall St. than Bernie, but Trump is better for Wall St. than Warren and Warren may be easier for Trump to beat than Bernie.

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Pricknick's picture

@Roy Blakeley
He is a senile, vile, past his sell by date, grabby son of a bitch, but pushing pedophile is a bit much.

Biden's a senile pedophile

When it's proven, I'll gladly call him one.

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Regardless of the path in life I chose, I realize it's always forward, never straight.

Her go to advisor for foreign policy is Madeline Albright...

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Shahryar's picture

by the Biden camp.

I don't know, don't care.

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Someone is trying to manipulate someone into something. Is it really Wall Street sending a warning about Warren? Is it the Dems trying sell Warren to skeptical progressives? Who can say? Only the anonymous sources know for sure!

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Idolizing a politician is like believing the stripper really likes you.

Alligator Ed's picture

@Dr. John Carpenter Warren's already exceeded her sell-by date. She now has been quietly bought up by the tycoons she blabbers about.

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When I googled that topic, the list came up with a link to a DKos diary. So I took a look...
The first two comments pointed the finger at all us folks at c99... we don't trust Warren...OH MY GOSH!! It appears that the application of reasonable scrutiny to any democratic candidate or their positions is still verboten over there. Just BUY this product. Don't read the label.

https://www.dailykos.com/stories/2019/9/30/1889022/-Unfortunately-Suppor...

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"Without the right to offend, freedom of speech does not exist." Taslima Nasrin