Arizona Voting Information

Dear Zonies:

Here's some information I found because it applies to my case, and I thought you might be interested too. Here's a table of interesting dates, from the AZ-SOS site:

Election Date Registration Deadline
Presidential Preference March 17, 2020 February 18, 2020
Primary August 4, 2020 July 6, 2020
General November 3, 2020 October 5, 2020

Unlike the rest of Amerika, Arizona doesn't like those long long long campaigns, and so schedules its primaries reasonably close to the general elections. This is basically a good thing, and we wish the rest of you would get on board, heh. Yes 3

Here's another important date I got from Wikipedia:

The (Democratic Party) convention is scheduled to be held from July 13–16, 2020.

Note our problem here: the Democratic Party convention is actually held before our primaries.

After that last, and totally fubar election, I (after 4 decades) abandoned the Democratic Party, as did so many others, and I did it between the "presidential preference" election and the party convention. My voter registration now says "No Party Declared" or some such thing. In that condition, I can go to the "primary" election polling place and, at that moment, choose any party for which I want to… well, in our case, to choose Electors.

In my head, and keeping mind that I am "No Party Declared", the narrative I create to describe the schedule is as follows:

  1. In March, voters choose the candidate of their party whom they want for president in the "presidential preference" election. Those results are taken to…
  2. The party convention held in July.
  3. In August, the voters choose the ELECTORS who will represent any party of their choosing at the infamous Electoral College.
  4. In November, the voters give some indication to the Secretary of State of Arizona about how those electors (already voted for) should be allocated. (OK, there are state laws about how this shall be done. For most states, it's "winner takes all" which isn't quite fair, but that's an argument for another time. Whatever.)

Remember last time? The Green Party didn't have their list of proposed electors ready at the deadline for the primary. So sure, they weren't needed after all, but a proper party needs to go through all the proper motions, anyway. Moving on…

Wherein I finally get to my point:

Note the difference in wording in items 1 and 3 above, regarding whom I may vote for, given that I am registered as "No Party Declared". In the "primary" election, I may specify (on that day, in my polling place) the party whose Electors I want to choose. But for the "presidential preference" election, I must have already chosen a Party before I will be allowed to vote for any candidate. Specifically, I must re-register as a Democrat if I want to vote for Bernie or Tulsi or (gods forbid) Biden.

Bad

So, and this is the important point, if you are in Arizona, and are registered as "No Party Declared" and you want to try to convince a Party (any party) to choose the candidate you like (or the one you don't like, if you're attempting to play it that way), you must register for your targeted party by February 18, 2020.

May the least harmful candidate win.
—yp.

Late update: Item 3 above is poorly stated. One cannot mix and match electors.
It should say: The voter selects a Party at the polling place, and then must choose from among the Electors proposed by that party.

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Comments

Pluto's Republic's picture

That works somewhat like the US Constitution does. The details got nailed down after the world had already moved on.

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10 users have voted.

Human salvation lies in the hands of the creatively maladjusted.

— Martin Luther King

yellopig's picture

@Pluto's Republic And this is so true:

after the world had already moved on.

Living in a rural area of a fly-over state, I'm ambivalent about the urge—so prevalent nowadays—to abolish the Electoral College.

But yes, the point WRT elections is that unless everybody implements similar rules, voting and election procedures start to seem random. And we won't adopt similar rules without the FEDs' dipping their sticky fingers in, and the moment they do, the Libertarians will rise up and… Well, that won't be a pretty sight.

Meanwhile, we need to have our own local state rules clear so that we can have whatever influence we can.

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8 users have voted.

“We may not be able to change the system, but we can make the system irrelevant in our lives and in the lives of those around us.”—John Beckett

snoopydawg's picture

IMO.

How can they hold their convention before the whole country has voted? How many other states will not have voted when they decide who won the primary? And will democrats once again let delegates and super delegates decide who wins? Remember Bernie won Virginia 44-32, but because of delegates Hillary was given the win. In what democratic society does that make sense?

BTW will the media do exit polling this time or will they decide that they don't want people to think the votes are being rigged? Again? Another thing. Will heavy democratic places have enough voting machines or will people be expected to stand in line all day? Will the close to a million people who have been kicked off the voting rolls be able to register in time to vote or will they have to jump through hoops? Any country that makes voting so difficult shouldn't be held up by the rest of the world as a free country.

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7 users have voted.

"It seems to me that the problem is that group party interests, in this case, are placed above the interests of the entire society and the interests of people,"

yellopig's picture

@snoopydawg
In Arizona, the Party chooses the delegates, it's completely out of our hands. However, those delegates are "pledged" to support the winner of the "Presidential Preference" election held in February March. Nothing to do with Electors. (Check your Constitution for the definition of "electors".)

Actually, last time, I'm pretty sure the "preference" election went for Bernie, but you won't find that on any official tallies anywhere, because of those other irregularities not attributable to Arizona's weird election laws. [At least these laws about the dates.]

So, anyway, theoretically, Arizonans will have voted prior to the convention.

As to your other questions, I am not well-informed enough to answer. But i do have one note: regarding 

close to a million people who have been kicked off the voting rolls

you may be talking about one state? There are probably that many in Florida alone (former Fla resident here). There are many more in other states, too. 

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9 users have voted.

“We may not be able to change the system, but we can make the system irrelevant in our lives and in the lives of those around us.”—John Beckett

snoopydawg's picture

@yellopig

My bad..reading comprehension is hard sometimes....but yeah the million includes all of the cities and states that happened in.

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4 users have voted.

"It seems to me that the problem is that group party interests, in this case, are placed above the interests of the entire society and the interests of people,"

yellopig's picture

@snoopydawg
I would include felons who have completed their sentences, and are still barred from voting, for life. Maybe I'm just taking the longer view…

Funny story here, about how silly the "former felon" part of this issue goes:

In my Florida town, our mayor was impeached in the late 90s because he wasn't a registered voter in our town (a requirement for office). He had lost his voting rights because of a felony marijuana conviction in the the early 70s.

The follow-up goes: he had an appointment to be "pardoned" with the governor (Jeb Bush, at the time), but missed it because of Hurricane Floyd, so he had to sit out the next election.

After his voting rights were reinstated, he was reelected about 6 or 7 times, because he was a really good mayor. Smile

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7 users have voted.

“We may not be able to change the system, but we can make the system irrelevant in our lives and in the lives of those around us.”—John Beckett

Wally's picture

@yellopig

58% to 40% for Bernie. 235,697 - 163,400 on March 22, 2016. She got 47 delegates, Bernie got 35.

Worst of all, too many people who didn't like Hillary didn't make the effort to vote for Bernie.

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Bisbonian's picture

@Wally , she wasn't IN the Primary in Arizona. She won the Presidential Preference Election. Misinformation like this continues to confuse Arizonans. 49 states vote for Presidential candidates in the Primaries. Arizona does not. Please don't tell them, "oh, it's the same thing." It's not. You have to be registered in a party to vote for Presidential candidates, in the PPE, in Arizona. The primaries are 'open'. Arizonans can vote for your State Reps, Senators, Mayor, and dogcatcher, regardless of party, in the Primaries.

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"I’m a human being, first and foremost, and as such I’m for whoever and whatever benefits humanity as a whole.” —Malcolm X

Wally's picture

@Bisbonian

. . . checking again and again that their registration is honored and recorded and they are not purged for some stupid reason.

Keep up the good work! It's hard for sure.

If Bernie doesn't win the nomination, I will probably just reregister as an independent in my state and never vote again for any candidate for any office. But that's just me. If it happens, I will essentially crawl under a rock as far as politics is concerned. Then again, Bernie might actually pull it off this time -- although Hillary 2.0 has emerged via Warren with her lying about Bernie's campaign (see Snoop's latest essay).

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yellopig's picture

@Wally
And they have all those very big vote counts and precise calculations of her "winning" percentage to back up their claim. And it all has nothing to do with our hackable electronic voting machines and fractional votes and all those other shenanigans we had last time.

And of course, none of those things are resolved, so they're free to do it all again.

What I saw was not a single person who voted for her, but crowds and crowds of Bernie supporters.

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3 users have voted.

“We may not be able to change the system, but we can make the system irrelevant in our lives and in the lives of those around us.”—John Beckett

Bisbonian's picture

We worked pretty hard for Bernie here, the last time around. The hardest part of it was convincing people that they had to be registered in a party to vote in the PPE. "Oh, but the Primaries are 'open'!" Yes, that is right, but the Primaries don't include the Presidential candidates...etc, etc.

You have it exactly right...register with a party by the middle of next month, or you're out of luck. And then check it several times before you go to the polls, or you could be out of luck again.

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11 users have voted.

"I’m a human being, first and foremost, and as such I’m for whoever and whatever benefits humanity as a whole.” —Malcolm X

yellopig's picture

@Bisbonian
I'm really glad I checked this. I haven't been paying as close attention to the rules this time.

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3 users have voted.

“We may not be able to change the system, but we can make the system irrelevant in our lives and in the lives of those around us.”—John Beckett

AZ think the Dems would have a shot at winning the state in the fall?

Last time, Trump only won there by 90k votes. At the very least it looks like a state where Ds should devote some GOTV resources, esp re the Hispanic community. A more winnable red state than TX.

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yellopig's picture

@wokkamile
Yes, you're right, Democrats probably have a marginally better chance winning AZ than TX, but that margin isn't large. Of course a lot depends on who ultimately gets nominated.

Don't be fooled by the fact that one of our senators is a Democrat: she's a firm bipartisan Blue Dog. We managed to get her elected over that horrid McSally, and then the governor just appointed the horrid McSally to the senate anyway.

The GOTV for Bernie was the best I've ever seen, and he "lost", so what does that tell us?

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2 users have voted.

“We may not be able to change the system, but we can make the system irrelevant in our lives and in the lives of those around us.”—John Beckett