The agenda of public control in America

You think you're so clever and classless and free
But you're still f*cking peasants as far as I can see.

- John Lennon

I'm writing this because I received this message insinuating that (I'm not going to say from whom) that the point of the pandemic and/ or the vaccine was to "control" us. The proceeding, then, is an investigation of the notion of "control" in some depth -- one which will reveal that "control" appears rather problematic as an explanation either of the pandemic or of the vaccine. A good investigation starts with the basics, and then proceeds forward to examine the matter at hand, and so this investigation will do as much.

The introductory text of any college-level course on "control" (in the context of our present, rather anomalous, era of history), or at least the introductory text for English-speaking people living in the core nations, would have to be Aldous Huxley's novel Brave New World, written in 1931 and published in 1932. If you've read this novel before reading this diary, you're more likely to understand this diary than the rest of the reading public.

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Brave New World, the novel, depicted, from the perspective of the society of ninety years ago, a fictional future society in which human beings were controlled to the maximum extent that they possibly could be. The concept for it, as Huxley himself related, began with a parody of H. G. Wells' (1923) utopian novel Men Like Gods, and then developed into something else -- but that that something else became a reflection upon America -- a place where everyone imagines her- or himself to be "free" but where, of all the countries in the world, everyone is the most thoroughly controlled.


Brave New World
, then, is a novel about control. A fictional extremely controlled society is imagined in this novel as a parody of a controlled society, and the controlled society was the America of 1931 -- but even more so it's our American society, here and now. This parody is done in much the way in which the fantastic societies depicted in Jonathan Swift's Gulliver's Travels served as parodies of the societies in which Swift actually lived. (Gulliver's Travels used to be a kids' book back when kids read books.)

Everyone in the imagined society of Brave New World played stupid games like "Centrifugal Bumble-Puppy" and spent their lives being entertained. The human race in Huxley's future was divided into a caste system: Alphas, Betas, Gammas, Deltas, and Epsilons -- determined by oxygen deprivation to the individual's brain before birth in the fetus state. Huxley's caste system has to be viewed as a smack-in-the-face to American society, which imagined (and imagines) that it is clever and classless and free. And, at the top of the hierarchy of Huxley's Brave New World? The "Controllers." That was the actual name he gave them.

The residents of Huxley's Brave New World were manufactured in test tubes instead of being born because one of the Controllers hated his mommy. They were controlled from birth to death through education, propaganda, hypnosis, and drugs. Drugs in the Brave New World were imagined as having been refined into a drug called "soma" -- a drug which in Huxley's fiction had all of the good side effects and none of the bad side effects of the other drugs. All of this is, as said above, in a manner of parody through exaggeration in the style of Jonathan Swift. Here and today we are trained to go through life repeating our parents' neuroses while in education we learn to memorize and regurgitate chunks of information so we can get grades, credits, and degrees. We develop into, to semi-quote the composer Frank Zappa, "loyal plastic robots for a world that doesn't care," much in the way in which the residents of the Brave New World are such things. I'm sure the NSA has us surveilled 24/7/365 anyway, thanks to the USA PATRIOT Act, so that the shadow government can know about it if we do something we aren't free to do.

Today, it must be observed, we live in an Aldous Huxley Brave New World, though with different parameters than the distant future imagined by Huxley in 1931. We are controlled by:

  • Money. This was the obsession of a 19th century philosopher whom it is useless to mention because Americans won't read his stuff anyway. It's also one of the main omissions of Brave New World, as the motivation of Huxley's Controllers was not money but rather that they wanted a society of docile servants who would not cause any trouble and who would therefore be easy to govern. Our present-day society's controllers, however, are motivated mainly by money. And, of course, they are motivated by that which money can buy: property.

    Back in the day, money was based on gold; now it's based on faith in the hegemonic role of the US government in the world. The social pretense, the locus of control, is that money can buy anything and everything. This social pretense allows Congress, through the Federal Reserve, to hand large piles of cash to the alteady-rich, so they can be controllers and not controlled.

    Every month, you must use money to pay taxes, rents, mortgages, and buy ordinary necessities, and you must solicit money from those who are willing to pay for your "services." You must offer "services" which are "billable," else you will not survive as an American, and you must be able to do so for the whole of your adult life (up to the point at which you will maybe be able to afford to retire, or maybe not.) In saying this, I wish to offer a "good luck" to the hundreds of thousands of homeless Americans who must rely upon whatever charity or government "temporary assistance to needy families" is available at any particular place or time, with requirements they are or aren't able to meet. Oh, and, given whatever plight you face in the world of America today, your money might not save you anyway.

  • War. Of those trillions of dollars printed up or encoded since the beginning of the era of dollar hegemony some time in the Seventies, about half of those dollars went to US preparations for war. War controls the youth of America through the poverty draft, which makes the military the employer of last resort. War makes the rich richer -- this enrichment of the rich, as Krystal Ball and Saagar Enjeti pointed out a month ago, was the main reason the US stayed in Afghanistan despite knowing a very long time ago that it wasn't going to win whatever war it was fighting there.
  • Advertising. The primary text for the discussion of advertising as an agency of control is Leiss, Kline, and Jhally's Social Communication in Advertising. Early editions in this book explained quite baldly how advertising continually reinvents popular culture as consumer subcultures, and thus in present-day society "personality" and "identity" are significantly products of advertising. Later editions of this book try to frame the situation as being one in which the consumer is more in charge -- but none of such readings are of any consequence. Advertising does not get you to buy a particular name-brand product so much as it positions you as a consumer of such products.
  • Politics. The American system is especially tight as regards political control. If your vote is to matter, and you are voting for any candidate for an office more prominent than that of city council, you must vote for candidates belonging to either of two parties, both of which (given the realities of climate change and their habitual inaction as regards those realities) are in essence death cults. Our eyes and ears on politics, moreover, are themselves controlled by --
  • The mass media. If you are an American, your mass media is controlled by a tiny few corporations, all of which are in tow to the two major political parties and to what I have been calling coalition politics in America today. The mass media, at any rate, has a "wandering eye" which determines from month to month what the mass public thinks is or isn't important politically. Please read Mark Pedelty's War Stories for elaboration on this last point.
  • Spectator sports. This stuff is like surplus patriotism -- if you aren't satisfied by waving an American flag outside of your house, you can wave a flag which displays the symbols and insignia of the Denver Broncos or whomever. Or you can buy tickets to see the sporting events and cheer your team on. It's also surplus mass media, for whom sports is "news" -- in fact, sports is the most accurate news most mass media will deliver. (Noam Chomsky once made this observation.)

    In rooting for a sports team, you are cheering on nothing of importance, as they are all in collusion through the leagues -- but this fact will not change the loudness of your voice or the ecstasy you feel when your team wins a game. You are, in short, being controlled.

  • Our pasts. This one is related to money. The ability to do anything in America today is related to one's ability to turn one's past record of having done things into an ability to convince a prospective employer to allow one to do things for money. The primary document one carries to validate one's past is called the "curriculum vitae" -- the "course of one's life" in Latin -- you spend your life "doing things" for money so that you can use that past to continue doing things for money.
  • The cops. Don't piss them off.

So this is the fly in the ointment of the "control" theories of COVID-19 and its attendant corporate vaccines. It's not as if we were otherwise totally free before the pandemic and so now this disease and its developed-on-the-fly vaccines have been invented and spread around the world so as to control us. We aren't totally free, in fact we aren't really free at all in any way beyond the circumscribed notion of "choice" (from menus we are unfree to choose), and we never were free. We're all being controlled. Americans think too much of "choice." "Choice," after all, was how the ACA was sold to us -- you can "choose" your insurance provider just like you could "choose" your doctor, and so in that way you were coerced into owning whatever raw deal you supposedly "chose." "Choice," then, is how Americans are coerced into loving their collective servitude.

What would the controllers of our society want with any of this anyway? They're already dealing with a virus which has been killing off a few hundred thousand useful idiots and some hundreds of thousands of innocent bystanders here and there while leaving the vast bulk of the population alive, interrupting events right and left by which, in normal times, the public would otherwise be controlled. What do you think it did for "control" that the major sports leagues had to play all of their games last season in stadiums emptied of fans? "Control" was thousands of spectators in stands cheering or booing depending on whether or not their teams were scoring. Why would you want revolution when your team's victory was (or is) just around the corner?

And so now they've got vaccines which are of limited effectiveness and which half the public rejects even though said vaccines are being offered for free. How is that "control"? It sounds like chaos to me. They had "control" already. Omigod the vaccine is going to kill us all! This we are told daily on Facebook. Except, of course, that the elites themselves are vaccinated. Now why would the vaccine kill us if it's going to kill them too?

Okay, I'm finished. You may now go back to feeling you are free, and that your freedom is so importantly constituted by the choices you so importantly make, except of course when your evil governor asks you to wear a mask when you go into an enclosed public space.

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Because they told you? Because I saw someone injecting J.B. Pritzker with something (saline?) on TV?

I fear that mRNA is going to be used as an infertility bomb for the Great reset.
No, no facts, just fear. All discussion of vaccine ignores J&J, Sputnik, and other non-mRNA vaccine. All public discussion centers on "two shots". Now talk of mandatory vaccine. And mandatory, third and fourth shots.

Do I have facts? No. just fear and knowledge of how our scumbag masters think. Why is Bill "Great Reset" Gates pushing so hard? Because he's a humanitarian? I'd take odds against him being a human!

Don't I trust the government? I spent half my life working for the government. thank God (and FDR) that I had a Union! The rest of time I was sporadically involved in political campaigns. Yeah. Working like an ass for criminal scum.

EDIT:
And what fatal/sterilizing oopsie might be in that "booster"? "Oh, what an unfortunate mistake!"

Am I comparing the 400 billionaires to the SS? You're damn right I am!

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I've seen lots of changes. What doesn't change is people. Same old hairless apes.

Cassiodorus's picture

@The Voice In the Wilderness because they have to be around people all the time and because they want some protection against the virus. And, of course, because it was available to them at a time when it was being denied to most of us. Privilege is their thing.

More likely is the pattern set by Tucker Carlson, who was vaccinated but who tells others not to get vaccinated. For me, but not for thee.

Are you telling me you're afraid of the vaccine but not of otherwise having been controlled throughout your life?

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"Freedom is always, and exclusively, freedom for the one who thinks differently.” -- Rosa Luxemburg

@Cassiodorus
because it could hold any genetic time bomb.
Conventional vaccine vaccines even those based on artificial viruses just trigger the body's natural reactions. I've had lots of those.
mRNA programs your cells. Bad. You have no idea what is being programmed or will be programmed in the future.

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I've seen lots of changes. What doesn't change is people. Same old hairless apes.

@The Voice In the Wilderness for someone to reprogram your dna is a bad precedent.

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Granma's picture

@Battle of Blair Mountain with your dna which resides in the cell nucleus.
In my opinion, you need to do a little research.

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CB's picture

@Granma @Granma
adenovirus-vectored sneaks a snippet of the engineered S-protein DNA along with an inactivated virus inside of the nucleus where it gets stripped down transcribed to the S-protein mRNA. This mRNA is then pushed out of the nucleus where it is translated by the ribosomes to actually produce the spike protein just as the mRNA vaccines do.

One important feature of the adenovirus vaccine is because DNA is significantly more robust and doesn't degrade as quickly as RNA. This makes a big difference for cold storage. Johnson & Johnson adenovirus-vectored vaccine can be stored at −20 °C. Pfizer’s mRNA vaccine is required to be stored at −70 °C.

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@CB The DNA template is transcribed into mRNA for translation into protein.

https://www.nature.com/scitable/topicpage/translation-dna-to-mrna-to-pro...

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CB's picture

@innatimm
especially for little used words. I have Broca’s aphasia caused by an ischemic stroke last April. I have difficulty 'finding' the correct words so I try to rephrase or use synonyms. I also compensate by doing a lot of cut and pasting as people will notice. My writing is a hell of lot better than my slurred speech.

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@CB n/t

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mimi's picture

@CB
knowledge.

See what I hate the most about the internet? the fact that nobody knows anything about the online persona he/she is talking to.

heh, slur on, great friend, it sounds beautiful to my ears.

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mimi

@CB
And it's already too late. Got one grandson unvaccinated. was gointg to persuade him to get J&J.
He will just have to take the risk so that not all the family will be mutants/sterile.

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I've seen lots of changes. What doesn't change is people. Same old hairless apes.

@The Voice In the Wilderness
We have been had! https://genomicsdaily.com/dna-genome/jj-vaccine-is-double-stranded-dna/
In the beginning they said that it was just a dead articial virus that the body's natural system would build antibodys afgainst. That link says the virus is just a vector to modify our genome to add resistance to the spike proteins. Just like flu shots and chickpox shots and measles. So what else are we being mutated into.

I'm very angry at being duped into becoming a GMO!

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I've seen lots of changes. What doesn't change is people. Same old hairless apes.

CB's picture

@The Voice In the Wilderness
be a first baby step into the brave new world of The Great Reset?

"The Great Reset Conspiracy Smoothie"
Naomi Klein - December 8 2020

A viral conspiracy theory blends together legitimate critiques with truly dangerous anti-vaccination fantasies and outright coronavirus denialism.

Writing about “The Great Reset” is not easy. It has turned into a viral conspiracy theory purporting to expose something no one ever attempted to hide, most of which is not really happening anyway, some of which actually should.

It’s extra confusing for me to unpick this particular knot because at the center of it all is a bastardization of a concept I know a little something about: the shock doctrine.

But here goes nothing.

Back in June, the World Economic Forum, best known for its annual Davos summit, kicked off a lunge for organizational relevance at a time when it was already clear that, for the foreseeable future, packing thousands of people, injected-cheek by lifted-jowl, into a Swiss ski resort to talk about harnessing the power of markets to end rural poverty was a nonstarter.

The effort was called the Great Website — I mean the Great Reset. And through articles, videos, webinars, podcasts, and a book by WEF founder Klaus Schwab, it provided a coronavirus-themed rebranding of all the things Davos does anyway, now hastily repackaged as a blueprint for reviving the global economy post-pandemic by “seeking a better form of capitalism.” The Great Reset was a place to hawk for-profit technofixes to complex social problems; to hear heads of transnational oil giants opine about the urgent need to tackle climate change; to listen to politicians say the things they say during crises: that this is a tragedy but also an opportunity, that they are committed to building back better, and ushering in a “fairer, greener, healthier planet.” Prince Charles, David Attenborough, and the head of the International Monetary Fund all figured prominently. That kind of thing.

In short, the Great Reset encompasses some good stuff that won’t happen and some bad stuff that certainly will and, frankly, nothing out of the ordinary in our era of “green” billionaires readying rockets for Mars. Indeed, anyone with even a cursory knowledge of Davos speak, and the number of times it has attempted to rebrand capitalism as a slightly buggy poverty alleviation and ecological restoration program, will recognize the vintage champagne in this online carafe. (This history is explored in an excellent new book and film by the law professor Joel Bakan, “The New Corporation: How ‘Good’ Corporations Are Bad for Democracy.”)
...

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snoopydawg's picture

@The Voice In the Wilderness

I find it weird that he will spend untold millions on getting vaccines to countries that continue to have abject poverty. Imagine if he and his fellow humanitarians cared enough to spend money to lift people out of poverty so that they can be healthier instead of experimenting on them giving them all kinds of vaccines. What was in that polio vaccine that paralyzed a lot of kids and why not give them the tried and true polio vaccine that has worked well for a long time? Just a few points to ponder about his massive heart that wants those kids to be healthy.

I also wonder if the Clinton foundation is still sending worthless AIDS drugs to Africa too. Is that the only drug they have access to?

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In a free country civil liberties are not only for certain groups.
So this is how liberty dies . . . with thunderous applause.
The donor class doesn’t want it, and Americans elect the bribed. So suck it up.

There is a lot of jabber about the concepts of Freedom and Liberty, usually coming from people whose whole lives are centered around total belief in a god who demands eternal loyalty and daily worship and a book full of ancient and mostly useless fables.

But hey... at least they are not being CONTROLLED!

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"Without the right to offend, freedom of speech does not exist." Taslima Nasrin

Pricknick's picture

@Fishtroller 02
They chose to worship an eye in the sky.
That's baseline dementia in my book and I aint no quack.

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Regardless of the path in life I chose, I realize it's always forward, never straight.

CB's picture

in the context of the current pandemic. Did you know that he was a die-hard eugenicist?

https://eugenicsarchive.ca/discover/tree/53239beb132156674b00025d#!

1932. In response to utopian authors of the 1920s, satirist Aldous Huxley began working on A Brave New World between May and August of 1931.

Huxley was deeply interested in eugenic politics. In the novel as well as in other essays published in the late 1920s and early 1930s, he defended eugenic policies of encouraging reproduction of the “intellectual classes” and sterilizing the “unfit”(Woiak, 2007, p.106).

In more recent analysis, Joanna Woiak argues that comparing Huxley’s literary texts with his non-literary essays provide insight into his belief on how eugenics overlap with Brave New World. She cites a 1927 essay, "A Note on Eugenics," in which Huxley argues that

“if, as would be the case in a perfectly eugenized state, every individual is capable of playing the superior part, who will consent or be content to do the dirty work and obey? The inhabitants of Mr. Well’s numerous Utopias solve the problem by ruling and being ruled. . . an admirable state of affairs if it could be arranged. . . states function as smoothly as they do because the greater part of the population is not very intelligent, dreads responsibility, and desires nothing better than to be told what to do. . .” (Huxley, 1927, p. 329-330, as cited in Wolak, 2007, p.115).

Similarly, in Brave New World, the stratified caste society’s lower orders are deliberately stunted both mentally and physically in order to maximize the efficacy and happiness of the society. This society is also based upon the principles of Henry Ford's assembly line.

Aldous Huxley's brother Julian Huxley was of a similar bent.

https://eugenics.us/julian-huxley

  • Julian Huxley: Population Control, Eugenics, and Birth Control all part of the same Program
  • Julian Huxley: Diversity and Eugenics in Education
  • Julian Huxley: The History of Population Control–Malthus and Darwin and Birth Control
  • Julian Huxley: Birth Control, Family Planning or Population Control All the Same Thing; Taking Control of Human Evolution (1963)

With that lead in, I'll leave you with the following food for thought:

How the Unthinkable Became Thinkable: Eric Lander, Julian Huxley and the Awakening of Sleeping Monsters
Matthew Ehret May 24, 2021

Will we see biotechnology serve the interests of humanity under a multipolar paradigm that cherishes national sovereignty, human life, family, and faith?

As much as it might cause us a fair deal of displeasure and even an upset stomach to consider such ideas as the hold eugenics has on our presently troubled era, I believe that ignoring such a topic really does no one any favors in the long run.
...

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Cassiodorus's picture

@CB Huxley after 1935 was more humanistic. Julian, on the other hand, was always kind of a problem.

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"Freedom is always, and exclusively, freedom for the one who thinks differently.” -- Rosa Luxemburg

CB's picture

@Cassiodorus
writing propaganda.

Julian Huxley did the heavy lifting.

The Life and Legacy of Julian Huxley
Huxley and Eugenics

Over the course of his lifetime, Julian Huxley developed a multifaceted position regarding eugenics, the applied science of improving the genetic composition of the human population. Eugenicists sought to achieve this goal through both encouraging reproduction among fit individuals and discouraging breeding among unfit populations.

Huxley’s position on eugenics is detailed below in an analysis of several of his most influential publications on eugenics, education, and race: his 1933 paper entitled “The Vital Importance of Eugenics,” his 1946 publication of the goals of UNESCO after becoming the organization’s first director-general, the UNESCO 1951 "Statement on Race," and his 1962 Galton Memorial Lecture to the British Eugenics Society. Contradictions abound between, and even within, several of these publications, but each address adds a specific dimension to Huxley’s overall position on eugenics, and together these sources detail the evolution of his stance on human biological inequality, education, and eugenic reform throughout the course of his career.
...

“UNESCO: Its Purpose and Its Philosophy” (1946)

After becoming the first director-general of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization in 1945, Huxley published “UNESCO: Its Purpose and Its Philosophy.” This manifesto outlined both the broad goals of this newly established organization and Huxley’s stance on how UNESCO should attempt to address them. More telling, however, was the degree to which Huxley’s publication reflected his views on eugenics.

He contended, in the 1946 publication, that UNESCO’s goals included “international peace and security, collaboration among the nations, and human welfare” as well as “The furtherance of the democratic principles of the dignity, equality and mutual respect of men, as well as respect for justice, for the rule of law and for the human rights and fundamental freedoms affirmed in the Charter of the United Nations” (Huxley, 1946).

Huxley put a uniquely eugenic spin on these goals, however, arguing that true human welfare could only be accomplished if individuals pursued the most desirable direction in human evolution. He argued that in particular that, in addition to educational reform, UNESCO’s key goals should be to promote population control and ‘the eugenic problem' (Toye, 2010: 327).
...

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Cassiodorus's picture

@CB nmi

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"Freedom is always, and exclusively, freedom for the one who thinks differently.” -- Rosa Luxemburg

Cassiodorus's picture

@CB that the society of the Brave New World is a society populated entirely by idiots -- outside, that is, of the little group of Controllers who supposedly run everything. The justification given by one of the Controllers for running such a society (and not some other social form) is illuminating. The Controller argues that there was some sort of great experiment in a society populated entirely by Alphas on the island of Cyprus and that the whole thing ended up in destructive warfare in which two-thirds of the population of the island was wiped out. In the novel, Huxley does not provide any counter-point to this grim and misanthropic view of human nature.

Brave New World is by no means to be regarded as a complete discussion of its topic. It must be added, however, that if Huxley had been some sort of straight-up eugenicist at the time, that H. G. Wells, a rather sincere fan of eugenics, wouldn't have hated the novel to the great extent that he did.

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"Freedom is always, and exclusively, freedom for the one who thinks differently.” -- Rosa Luxemburg

CB's picture

@Cassiodorus
co-wrote The Science of Life (1931).

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Cassiodorus's picture

@CB didn't like each other.

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"Freedom is always, and exclusively, freedom for the one who thinks differently.” -- Rosa Luxemburg

CB's picture

@Cassiodorus
The whole pack were eugenicists of varying flavors and merely differed on the means.

Aldous Huxley and Our Brave New World, Part II
By R. F. Georgy

As I will argue later in this installment, both Huxley’s and Orwell’s dystopian visions have been realized, but not by means of coercive state control or narco-hypnotic conditioning. Neither Huxley nor Orwell could have anticipated the digital age. Before I explore the relevance of Huxley’s work to our dystopian present, it is important to explore his influences.

Huxley established himself early in his career as a successful writer and satirist...
...
Although Huxley was heavily influenced by the adventure and utopian writer, H. G. Wells, he never cared for the man, labeling him as a “vulgar little man.”[i] Part of Huxley’s disdain was due to Wells’ anti-semitism.

For his part, Wells believed that Brave New World was intended as a satiric response to his book, Men Like Gods. Wells felt offended and accused Huxley of misunderstanding his utopian vision. Huxley, of course, both understood and rejected Wells’ idealized embrace of a future where scientific knowledge is a guiding principle. In the letters Huxley wrote during the early 1930s, he stated explicitly that his aim was to expose the “horror of the Wellsian Utopia”[ii] Beyond the influence of his contemporaries, Huxley’s doubts about the benefits of science and technology came from Dostoevsky. In Notes from the Underground, Dostoevsky’s Underground Man declares: “Knowledge alone will teach us (…), that man, in fact, does not have and never had neither will, nor wants, but is, in fact, something like a piano key, or an organ pin; that there are laws of nature beyond the world; and everything that man does is not happening in accordance with his will, but just happens, in accordance with the laws of nature. It is sufficient to discover these laws of nature and man will cease to be responsible for his deeds, and will lead his life with ease.”[iii] The idea that the laws of nature could be discovered and used to control and manipulate human beings would become the theme of Huxley’s Brave New World.

H. G. Wells was partly correct that Huxley wrote Brave New World as a derisive parody of Men Like Gods. The truth, however, was slightly more nuanced. According to Huxley, “The reading of Men Like Gods evoked in me an almost pathological reaction in the direction of cynical anti-idealism. So much so that, before I finished the book, I had resolved to write a derisive parody of this most optimistic of Wells’ Utopias. But when I addressed myself to the problem of creating a negative Nowhere, a Utopia in reverse, I found the subject so fascinatingly pregnant with so many kinds of literary and psychological possibilities that I forgot Men Like Gods and addressed myself in all seriousness to the task of writing the book that was later to be known as Brave New World.”[iv] Regardless of Huxley’s motivation, Wells took offense and his aversion towards Huxley lasted more than ten years. If Huxley initially planned to satirize Wellsian Utopian tropes, then the question becomes: Where did he draw inspiration from for his dystopian ideas?
...

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Cassiodorus's picture

@CB Try not to make your point "don't read Aldous Huxley because he's nothing but a eugenicist." The American mass public already has plenty of excuses for semi-literacy (or reasons not to read stuff, for those who dislike big words), and I've already shown you some good counter-evidence which points to the notion that Huxley was at that time not a eugenicist but rather a pessimist.

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CB's picture

@Cassiodorus
If anything, the fact that he was a eugenicist is all the more reason to read him.

Social-Darwinism was de rigueur at the end of the 19th century (and still exists in a more 'gentrified' way today). Look at Rudyard Kipling's "The White Man's Burden" - “your new-caught, sullen peoples, half-devil and half-child,”. Other readings I would include is Thomas Robert Malthus - "An Essay on the Principle of Population". Many of these ideas came directly from interpretations of Charles Darwin's "On the Origin of Species".

What I was trying to do is use your diary as a lead-in to show that there can be new ideas, new ways of thinking. There are ways of managing our society that don't lead us into the eugenicist's Malthusian Trap. That human advancement is not restricted by a closed system where Aldous Huxley's dystopian future awaits.

Again I would invite you to have look at a different possibility for the future of peoplekind on this earth. I will include more of Matthew Ehret's work to tempt you:

How the Unthinkable Became Thinkable: Eric Lander, Julian Huxley and the Awakening of Sleeping Monsters

Will we see biotechnology serve the interests of humanity under a multipolar paradigm that cherishes national sovereignty, human life, family, and faith?

As much as it might cause us a fair deal of displeasure and even an upset stomach to consider such ideas as the hold eugenics has on our presently troubled era, I believe that ignoring such a topic really does no one any favors in the long run.

This is especially serious, as leading World Economic Forum darlings like Yuval Harari flaunt such concepts as “the new global useless class” which Artificial intelligence, genetic engineering, automation and the Fourth Industrial Revolution is supposedly ushering in. Other Davos creatures like Klaus Schwab call openly for a microchipped global citizenry capable of interfacing with a global web with a single thought while Elon Musk and Mark Zuckerberg promote ‘neuralinks’ to “keep humanity relevant” by merging with computers in a new epoch of evolutionary biology.

Leading Darwinian geneticists like Sir James Watson and Sir Richard Dawkins openly defend eugenics while a technocracy consolidates itself in a governing station using a “Great Reset” as an excuse to usher in a new post-nation state era.

If there is something fundamentally evil lurking behind these processes which has any connection to the Anglo-American rise of fascism and eugenics nearly a century ago, then let’s at least have the courage to explore that possibility. It was after all, only by looking at this ugliness 80 years ago, that patriots were able to take appropriate measures to prevent a bankers’ technocratic dictatorship in 1933 and again during WW2.. so perhaps a similar display of courage to think the unthinkable might be worth the effort for those who might find themselves in a similar situation today.
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The Role of Sir Julian Huxley

One of the conceptual grand strategists of this process was a man named Julian Sorrel Huxley (1887-1975). Celebrated as a biologist, and social reformer, Julian was a devout life-long member of the British Eugenics Society serving alongside John Maynard Keynes as secretary and later as its president.

Julian was a busy man, who along with his brother Aldous, worked hard to fill the very large shoes of their grandfather Thomas (aka: Darwin’s bulldog). While simultaneously managing the post-WW2 eugenics movement, Julian found himself setting into motion the modern environmental movement as founder of the International Union for the Conservation of Nature in 1948, co-founding the World Wildlife Fund in 1961, created the term “transhumanism” and also founding an immensely influential United Nations body called UNESCO (abbreviated for the United Nations Education, Science and Cultural Organization) in 1946 which he ran as Director General from 1946-1948.
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To what end would this “world political unity” be aimed? Several pages later, Huxley’s vision is laid out in all of its twisted detail:

“At the moment, it is probable that the indirect effect of civilization is dysgenic instead of eugenic, and in any case it seems likely that the dead weight of genetic stupidity, physical weakness, mental instability and disease proneness, which already exist in the human species will prove too great a burden for real progress to be achieved. Thus even though it is quite true that any radical eugenic policy will be for many years politically and psychologically impossible, it will be important for UNESCO to see that the eugenic problem is examined with the greatest care and that the public mind is informed of the issues at stake so that much that is now unthinkable may at least become thinkable.”
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In January 2021, John Holdren congratulated Erik Lander for being appointed Joe Biden’s Science Czar (Director of White House Science and Technology Policy)- the position formerly held by Holdren. In this position, Lander has overseen the re-activation of every Obama-era science policy as part of a technocratic overhaul of the U.S. government in conformity with the World Economic Forum’s Great Reset agenda. Using the vast power of the Emergency Authorization Act to bypass the FDA and steamroll gene therapy technologies passing themselves off as “vaccines”, a new social experiment has begun. CRISPR technology is already being hailed as a key to solving the new mutating strains of COVID-19 and is being used as a “vaccine” for certain tropical diseases as of this writing. The obvious connection between eugenics organizations of yesterday and the rise of modern mRNA operations associated with GAVI and Oxford’s Astra Zeneca unveiled by investigative journalist Whitney Webb earlier this year should be kept firmly in mind.

Will this technology be used by modern day heirs of Nazi-sponsoring eugenicists in an effort to pick up where Dr. Mengele left off OR will we see this biotechnology serve the interests of humanity under a multipolar paradigm that cherishes national sovereignty, human life, family, and faith?
...

More articles by Matthew Ehret

Breaking From Cycles of Destruction by Leaping to a Multipolar Future
September 14, 2021
The Multipolar Alliance has demonstrated a profound understanding of the oncoming collapse and has made many maneuvers to establish a new financial, security, economic architecture, Matt Ehret writes.

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Cassiodorus's picture

@CB has anything to do with eugenics.

"Crome Yellow" and "Antic Hay" were cute, funny, and unflattering portraits of intellectualism in the Twenties based upon Huxley's experience at Garsington. "Those Barren Leaves" is a botched attempt at profundity, which came to fruition in "Point Counter Point." "Point Counter Point" is about decadent intellectuals. "Brave New World" is pessimistic, and "Eyeless in Gaza" is about Huxley's post-1935 journey to a new way of thinking. "After Many a Summer" is about transcendence, and the novels after that are mostly about mysticism, with the exception of "Ape and Essence," which is about nuclear war. "Island" is about utopia done right -- through education, not eugenics.

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"Freedom is always, and exclusively, freedom for the one who thinks differently.” -- Rosa Luxemburg

CB's picture

@Cassiodorus
and playing around with Scientology as he did before with "Doors of Perception"

“It’s dark because you are trying too hard.
Lightly child, lightly. Learn to do everything lightly.
Yes, feel lightly even though you’re feeling deeply.
Just lightly let things happen and lightly cope with them.

I was so preposterously serious in those days, such a humorless little prig.
Lightly, lightly – it’s the best advice ever given me.
When it comes to dying even. Nothing ponderous, or portentous, or emphatic.
No rhetoric, no tremolos, no self conscious persona putting on its celebrated imitation of Christ or Little Nell.
And of course, no theology, no metaphysics.
Just the fact of dying and the fact of the clear light.

So throw away your baggage and go forward.
There are quicksands all about you, sucking at your feet,
trying to suck you down into fear and self-pity and despair.
That’s why you must walk so lightly.
Lightly my darling,
on tiptoes and no luggage,
not even a sponge bag,
completely unencumbered.”

Aldous Huxley, Island

This brings back old memories. Reading Huxley, experimenting with LSD and, much later, working to bring down Scientology in the newsgroup alt.religion.scientology with the Xenu revelations.

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@CB the masses just want to be left alone and NOT told what to do.

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You have covered pretty much the state we're in. I would throw in the internet and the whole social media/Facebook/influencer phenomena and the willing surrender of our privacy. I have been thinking a lot about the time before money and greed became our true religion.

I remember reading how Benjamin Franklin was complaining to London how the indentured servants, men and women, joined Native American tribes in droves, but the opposite, natives crossing to the colonist society rarely happened. When asked why, the people who joined tribes felt they were a family, that their "work" was valued and needed, and they were equals, including women. To colonists the servants were only there to enrich their masters and their lives were organized to fulfill that aim. Kinda like today.

We have no frontiers any more, no where to go to leave this all behind. It is very difficult to "drop out" of this mess, and I believe that we could be tracked down by the PTB any time they want. As for control, I think the 60's and 70's caused our government to look inward to control a population that was demanding change in society, and it never stopped.

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mimi's picture

suveilled and that is a fact. Emprisoned my whole life. I have heard about the Huxley guy and somewhere in my bookshelves he hides, but now I am glad I didn|t read him.

What|s brave about this his world? It is the lousiest world to begin with.

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mimi

Cassiodorus's picture

@mimi The Lilliputians and Brobdingnagians are pretty ugly too.

Or, alternate strategy: learn to appreciate parody?

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"Freedom is always, and exclusively, freedom for the one who thinks differently.” -- Rosa Luxemburg

@mimi
At least the boys did. free sex and drugs for the asking. Utopia!

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I've seen lots of changes. What doesn't change is people. Same old hairless apes.

Lookout's picture

where he suggest a more idyllic society. I especially liked his school design in that book.

In BNW, people are controlled by pleasure from drugs, entertainment and so on (in addition to genetic predisposition). In 1984 it is punitive control. We have some of both today in our society. But perhaps Fahrenheit 451 tracks better in today's world of censorship and allowed conversation. All three books are relevant really.

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“Until justice rolls down like water and righteousness like a mighty stream.”

Dawn's Meta's picture

Thank you CB and Cassiodorus.

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A society grows great when old men plant trees in whose shade they know they shall never sit. Allegedly Greek, but more possibly fairly modern quote.

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magiamma's picture

@Dawn's Meta
Fabulous convo Cass and CB!

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CB's picture

@magiamma
He was nowhere near what his brother was as far as being a eugenicist. My memory took me back to his dystopian novel of the future - Brave New World and I coloured him with too wide a brush.

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Cassiodorus's picture

@CB did not always have good reading choices. The source you quoted on "A Note on Eugenics" was from an essay collection called Proper Studies, which isn't my favorite (though I do admit to owning a copy). Mid-1920s Huxley learned about economics by reading Vilfredo Pareto, also not my favorite.

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"Freedom is always, and exclusively, freedom for the one who thinks differently.” -- Rosa Luxemburg

enhydra lutris's picture

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That, in its essence, is fascism--ownership of government by an individual, by a group, or by any other controlling private power. -- Franklin D. Roosevelt --

mimi's picture

was the way libraries were used to expose kids to reading. There was nothing equivalent in the German libraries' usage and culture in my highschool years (mid sixties). You all seem to have read much, much more than most kids of my generation did in their highschool years.

I detected our local library only, when I was in highschool and I started to understand what the Nazi regime's genocide was in relation to the German Jewish population. (of course our history highschool "teacher*in" - heh, it is so much fun to play with those asterix words - conveniently stopped her history lessons at the end of the nineteenth century).I read all the biographies of holocaust survivors I could get my hands on. After highschool, when blatant racism entered my personal life, I rarely needed the library's books. I lived and heard and listened to racist feelings of people around me all the time. No way to not understand what it meant.

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mimi

mimi's picture

because I want to live an Internetlessly life.

Can you live without the internet?

Bye, bye.

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mimi